This season, strive for wellness in every dimension

With changes in the weather often come changes in how we feel, whether that means feeling cold, feeling sadness, or simply feeling different than the previous week. Whatever we’re feeling, overall wellness is important for optimal health. The following tips can help us make sure our wellness is in top shape!

To improve your emotional wellness

Practice optimism. Read books that interest you, and spend time with family and friends. Manage stress by setting boundaries, laughing, smiling, and hugging.

To improve your environmental wellness

Respect resources by choosing green processes. Seek ways to spend time in natural settings through walking paths, meditation, gardening, and similar options

To improve your intellectual wellness

Read. Challenge your brain with games. Learn new skills, and share and discuss your interests with others.

To improve your occupational wellness

Pursue interests. Contribute your passion or hobby in a paid or volunteer role. Recognize the value of your contribution, and get involved in your community.

To improve your physical wellness

Engage in regular physical activity, get adequate sleep, and have regular health checkups. Get a massage, eat a variety of healthy foods, and ask your doctor which vitamins might benefit you. (These things will also help your emotional wellness!)

To improve your social wellness

Listen to and care for others. Touch, hug, and laugh. Develop and nurture close, warm friendships. Join a club or an organization.

To improve your spiritual wellness

Live with a sense of purpose, guided by personal values. Participate in group or individual faith-based activities, meditation, or mindful exercises (tai chi, Qigong, yoga).

Practice wellness every day for the healthiest you!

Focus on health all hours of the day (and night)

While being active, exercising regularly, and eating a balanced diet are often touted as the keys to a healthy lifestyle, the amount and quality of your sleep is just as important.

Getting enough sleep provides valuable benefits for both our minds and bodies, as it can affect our immune system, appetite, hormone levels, blood pressure, and more.

As people age, falling asleep and staying asleep can become more of a struggle, and the prevalence of insomnia rises, as well. This can be caused by changes in circadian rhythms, hormone levels, lifestyle habits, or effects from medications.

However, sleep needs remain the same throughout adulthood—seven to nine hours per night. A lack of quality sleep each night can lead to reduced productivity, daytime sleepiness, depression, increased risk of obesity, and other health concerns.

There are certain practices you can follow to help fall asleep faster and get quality sleep each night:

  • Go to bed and get up at the same time every day.
  • Do not nap for longer than 20 minutes.
  • Use your bed only for sleeping. Do not read, snack, or watch television in bed.
  • Avoid nicotine and alcohol in the evenings.
  • Talk to your doctor about medications that may be keeping you awake at night, such as antidepressants, beta-blockers, and cardiovascular drugs.

Taking care of yourself at night can help your daytime hours be safer, healthier, and more enjoyable.

Is it time for a change?

Getting older and entering retirement age often means having more time to spend on activities we enjoy and having the free time to travel and spend time with friends and family. But it also means that we need to be aware of how our bodies are changing, and that our need for care will likely increase.

As the adult child of an older adult, it can be difficult knowing when it’s time step in and help a loved one increase their level of care. However, there are things to be aware of that can help you know when it may be time to intervene.

When visiting your loved one, try to be aware of these possible indicators:
    • Physical changes like sudden weight loss, bruises, or reduced personal grooming
    • Increased difficulty with everyday activities like cooking, bathing, and dressing
    • Risky behavior like poor medication management, keeping old/spoiled food in the refrigerator, inability to care for a pet, or hiding falls
    • Emotional changes such as unusual or unexplained depression, stress, or anxiety; a lack of enthusiasm for normal activities; and less contact with friends and family
    • Cognitive changes like forgetting names of familiar people; not paying bills; dents in the car; unopened mail or packages; and difficulty remembering to shop, cook, or eat

If you determine that extra help is needed, an inclusive care community can often be the best solution. With this type of care, only the level of help that is needed is provided, but as the need becomes greater over time, the level of care is also increased. This is the ideal solution for people wishing to “age in place.”

Being the healthiest we can and living happy, satisfied lives requires comfort and certainty in the health care we receive. By monitoring the health of our loved ones, we can make sure these concerns are provided for as early as possible!

 

Spend time with others and build your social wellness

We spend much of our lives with built-in opportunities for socializing: school, work, parent-teacher meetings, entertaining, and just being out and about in our communities. But with retirement, isolation and loneliness become valid concerns. Many people lose their sense of belonging and begin to feel detached.

Regular social interaction is proven to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular problems, arthritis, and Alzheimer’s disease; lower blood pressure; increase self-confidence; and reduce the risk of depression. Without opportunities to connect with others, we’re missing out on significant health benefits!

Fortunately, the opportunities for socializing at any age are more plentiful than you may realize—and often help cultivate other dimensions of wellness, as well.

Here are just a few ideas for staying socially active:

  • Attend regular group activities. Weekly church services and club or group meetings are great outlets for socializing and exploring interests.
  • Spend time with loved ones. It may seem obvious, but regular quality time together with friends and family in whatever way possible can help boost personal wellness.
  • Get online! When face-to-face socializing is not possible, connecting with others over the internet can provide the benefits of social interactions. For instance, with Skype you can “attend” a family gathering you might otherwise miss!

Connect with others and find your place in your community—you’re never too old to make a new friend!

Do what you enjoy and live with purpose!

“You make a living by what you get. You make a life by what you give.”

Winston Churchill

Self-worth is often tied to one’s occupation, which can cause many people to feel depressed and a lack of purpose when it’s time to retire. Having more time to relax and enjoy leisure activities can actually feel like a loss.

But engaging in meaningful work doesn’t have to end in your later years. There are many opportunities to use your skills and passions—or gain new ones—while contributing to the community you live in.

For example, you can:

  • Spend time on hobbies that benefit yourself and others such as gardening and woodworking.
  • Pursue creative endeavors such as painting, sewing, music, or writing to share your talents with others.
  • Get involved in your community and share your ideas. Join a resident committee or volunteer to help effect change.
  • Share your knowledge with others: become a mentor, tutor a student, or read to young children.
  • Try something new! Take a class, start a club, or teach yourself a new skill.

Embrace the freedom of retirement by focusing on activities that you enjoy. Then, find a way to expand their reach into your greater community. Before you know it, your days will be filled and fulfilling!

Give your brain a reason to function!

As we age, inevitable changes occur throughout the body, including the brain. In older adults, some areas of mental ability (e.g., vocabulary and analytical skills) actually improve.

Did you know that 50% of cognitive function is determined by our genetics and age, while the other 50% is under our direct control?

Here are a few things that are thought to increase the likelihood of cognitive decline:

  • Lack of mental and physical activity
  • Substance use and abuse
  • Social isolation
  • Poor nutrition and sleep
  • Chronic stress
  • Medical conditions such as diabetes, depression, or hypertension.

How can we maximize our mental ability and reduce the effects of aging?

Recent research proves we can increase the number of neural connections at any age by challenging our brain. More connections mean improved cognitive function and fewer symptoms caused by dementia or trauma.

This requires a multi-faceted approach. Wellness initiatives such as building a social network, continuous learning, improving skills or learning new ones, physical activity, good sleep, and nutrition are proven to have a huge impact and long-lasting effects.

Attend exhibits, plays, musicals, and poetry readings; take a workshop or course; start a new hobby; listen to TED talks; download an app for brain stimulation.

If you are learning something new, changing a pattern or routine, or exercising your mind while you exercise your body, you are focusing on your intellectual wellness. And people who develop their intellectual wellness are more likely to maintain healthy cognitive function with age.

Proper Poise for Healthy Living

While we’re careful about what we eat and how much we sleep, sometimes we forget how important moving correctly is. As we get more active outdoors with friends and family, let’s take a moment to reflect on the importance of ergonomics—the science of human safety and capabilities—in our everyday lives.

The ways we sleep, sit, twist, bend, reach, and stand can all have lasting effects on the health of our bodies. If not practiced properly, repetitive actions can lead to overused muscles, poor posture, and eventually even injury. As we age, our muscle and bone mass naturally decrease, which can lead to stiff joints and limited mobility.

No matter what activities you’re doing, it’s important to make sure you’re safe and comfortable at all times. The following tips can provide a helpful starting point to assess your ergonomic safeguards.

  • When sitting at a computer, make sure your feet are flat on the ground, your monitor is at eye level, and your wrists are flat and straight. And be sure to sit up straight.
  • If you have to stay in one spot for a prolonged amount of time, don’t just sit—get up and walk around every hour to avoid slouching or slumping.
  • Any time you must stand for long periods of time, be sure to wear supportive footwear to help maintain the body’s center of gravity and alignment of the spine.
  • When lifting something from the ground, bend only at the knees and hips, keep the object close to your body, and avoid twisting while lifting.
  • Get regular aerobic exercise—such as running, walking, or swimming—to help the muscles of the back stay strong and promote good posture.

By staying proactive and practicing proper posture in everyday activities, you can keep your body pain-free and healthy!

Seven Dimensions for Full Living

As we age, experts agree it is essential that we stay physically active. But many don’t realize there are several other factors that add up to healthy wholeness. In fact, living a full and satisfied life means overall “wellness,” which is defined by more than physical well-being.

In 1976, Dr. Bill Hettler, co-founder of the National Wellness Institute, developed a six-dimensional model for achieving wellness. According to Dr. Hettler’s model, by focusing on and balancing each of these factors, a more complete form of wellness could be achieved.

In the years since Dr. Hettler made his discovery, a variety of organizations, from universities to health care professionals, have adopted these dimensions. And in the years following, a seventh dimension has been added.

The seven dimensions of wellness are:

  • Emotional: Being aware of feelings and coping with challenges in a respectful way signals emotional wellness and helps create a balance in life.
  • Physical: Healthy lifestyle choices can help maintain or improve health and function.
  • Spiritual: Living with a sense of purpose in life and being guided by personal values is key to our well-being and connection to the larger world and others.
  • Occupational: Utilizing our skills and passion, while cultivating personal satisfaction, is valuable to both society and the individual.
  • Intellectual: Engaging in intellectually stimulating activities is a proven approach to maintaining cognitive function.
  • Social: Positive social support has a protective influence on our health and well-being.
  • Environmental: Living with a greater awareness of the world allows us to begin to make environmentally friendly choices.

The dimensions in action

At Touchmark, the seven dimensions of wellness are an essential part of the Full Life Wellness & Life Enrichment Program™. This award-winning program identifies people’s strengths, skills, needs, interests, and goals to help them lead happy, healthy, and full lives.

By focusing on each dimension, individuals become aware of the dimensions’ interconnectedness and how they contribute to overall health. And the dimensions can be applied in multiple ways to nearly every area of daily activity. For example, going on a hike with friends combines aspects of the physical, social, and environmental, but may also involve the spiritual, emotional, and even the occupational and intellectual, depending on conversations, thoughts, and experiences. The same dimensions may interact in a variety of ways when we go on a picnic, play a game of pickleball, or visit a museum.

Touchmark’s Health & Fitness Club can help by offering residents a firm foundation in the physical that can be easily added onto with other elements like the mental, in classes like yoga, and the social, intellectual, and more in group fitness classes and other group activities in the heated pool.

In order to provide a plethora of opportunities for these kinds of interdimensional crossovers, Touchmark uses its Full Life Wellness & Life Enrichment Program and the seven dimensions to craft daily diverse and creative events and activities that often go beyond what some might expect from a retirement community.

“Residents may find themselves on a seven-day train trip through California, digging in at our old-fashioned clam bake, or enjoying the sights of Touchmark’s annual Father’s Day Weekend Classic Car Show,” says Touchmark at Meadow Lake Village Executive Director Matthew Hoskin. “By carefully listening to what people are interested in, we’re able to offer residents a lifestyle that’s not only fun, enriching, and engaging, but also includes all the elements of wellness.”

Touchmark believes that a full life is available to anyone—no matter one’s age—and its Full Life program ensures all residents have the unique tools, opportunities, and community support to bring their personal vision to life.

Meet Jim Nelson and Marilyn Ring-Nelson

Living their “full-to-bursting” life

At Touchmark, residents experience the full life. Marilyn Ring-Nelson laughs heartily as she says, “It’s not just the ‘full’ life. It’s the ‘full-to-bursting’ life! There is so much to do here!”

Prior to living at Touchmark, Jim Nelson would have described himself as being quite content with the title “the less social one” in the family. He says, “I didn’t really enjoy meeting new people or going out much. What I didn’t expect was that changing after moving here.” Now, when Marilyn asks if he’s interested in doing an activity, Jim usually says without hesitation, “That sounds like fun!”

Time for the next chapter

Married for 35 years, Jim and Marilyn enjoy walking and traveling, and they are avid readers and book lovers! Before their love of books turned into love for one another, Jim had lived in Reno. For years, he was a political reporter and sports editor for the Reno Evening Gazette. He was also a driver for the Washoe County Library’s Bookmobile.

Marilyn, meanwhile, had built a 33-year career working as a librarian at the Seattle Public Library. She managed the Bookmobile department in her last 15 years prior to retirement.

It was in that role that Marilyn interviewed Jim for a job. He initially turned down the offer, opting instead to ask Marilyn out on a date. Eventually, he started working at the library, holding several positions including Branch Clerical Supervisor, Library Associate, and Bookmobile Driver.

Two years ago on the road home after attending her eighth-grade school reunion, the couple looked at each other and said, “We don’t want to go back to Seattle.” Getting places took longer because of increased traffic. “This made getting together with friends or enjoying an evening at a restaurant or concert more difficult, says Marilyn, who was born and raised in Spokane.

Unlike some older adults who relocate to be closer to family (often grandchildren), Jim and Marilyn moved to Touchmark in Spokane, even though their family, which includes four children, three grandchildren, and a great-grandson, are still living on the west side of the state.

Jim says they researched several retirement communities; once they visited Touchmark, “We simply knew. This is where we want to be.”

Jumping into new adventures

As Marilyn puts it, “The day we arrived, we plunged into life here at Touchmark, because we didn’t have any other distractions. We didn’t know anyone, so we were kind of forced to do activities to meet people.”

They love the mix of social opportunities they have enjoyed. The list is lengthy and includes the Ping-Pong® Tournament, Mardi Gras, numerous restaurant outings, Happy Hour, exercise classes, the workout room, shopping trips, and a day excursion to Palouse Falls, to name just a few. Every Thursday, both enjoy attending Cottage Coffee Hour with other cottage residents. Typically, the men and women separate into groups, with each chatting about their interests. This fall, they’ll take part in their boldest social activity to date: a trip to Cape Cod with others from Touchmark. The couple couldn’t be more excited!

Social cheerleaders

Marilyn is the more outgoing of the pair, but it was Jim who attended Touchmark’s annual Harvest Festival, where residents line the hallways to pass out candy to hundreds of neighborhood kids in costume and help at a mini carnival. Jim loved it so much, he says, “I’m insisting Marilyn joins me this year!”

The enthusiasm the pair have for their lives at Touchmark is infectious. Jim admits moving felt a bit risky, but says it all worked out. “In our day-to-day life here, we wake up happy. We both look forward to almost everything there is to do here. We’ll try everything!”

Marilyn nods in agreement, adding, “There’s something to do almost all the time!”

Volunteerism is a winning way to spend your day

As you consider getting out in warmer weather, think about what types of activities you would most like to take part in. Any type of activity that keeps you moving and intellectually engaged is great, and what if you could do something for someone else at the same time?

One way to accomplish all that is by volunteering! In fact, there are many different types of volunteering, and none of them is a wasted effort. Here are some ways to spend a few hours each week or month:

Deliver meals on wheels. Make sure other seniors get the nourishment they need by delivering food and conversation to their doors!

Assist other seniors. Perform tasks around the house, like light housekeeping and cooking, for seniors who need a little extra help. Escort them to a store or the park, so they can share in the joy of nicer weather and social engagement!

Work with animals. Call a local shelter and offer your assistance! Many shelters have opportunities to help walk dogs and feed and groom all kinds of critters. You’re in fur a good time!

Help youngsters. Help kids learn to read, mentor teens, care for premature infants, and more! There are so many children who could benefit from your experience, knowledge, and compassion. When school is back in session, many teachers love to have outside help with story times and paper grading, too! Call a nearby school and see what you can do.

Having a little extra time on our hands is never a bad thing, but using it to help others can make a real difference to people in our community. We all need a little help now and then, so let’s pay it forward whenever we can!