Practice self-care to encourage overall wellness

February is the month of love, and this month we’re focusing on self-love! Taking care of mind, body, and spirit helps us feel our best and live each day to its fullest.

It’s easy to get caught up in our busy schedules and worry about our home, bills, or family before we consider our own well-being. But taking time for ourselves actually makes us better prepared to handle our other responsibilities.

Consider these simple ways to put yourself first and embrace personal wellness throughout the year:

  • Make sure you’re up-to-date on your state of health. The best way to stay healthy is to know where you’re at, and what areas you need to take extra care in. See your doctor regularly and take as active a role as you can in your care.
  • Try to make your physical self a priority. Taking the time to shower, brush your teeth, and get dressed each day—no matter how much or how little is on your schedule—helps to provide a sense of purpose and feel put-together.
  • Express gratitude. Surround yourself with positive people who build you up and be sure to share your appreciation with them regularly. Doing something nice for someone else benefits both giver and receiver. Spreading kindness can spark a chain reaction and inspires positivity in all!
  • Take time to recharge. After a busy day, set aside time to refuel in whatever way works best for you. Read a book, take a walk, unplug from your phone, and just enjoy the quiet time by yourself.

Nurture your social wellness this spring!

Regardless of what the weather forecast says for this month, spring is on its way! This season of growth is a great time to reconnect with friends and cultivate social wellness after a long and cold winter inside.

Socialization and friendships provide significant benefits to our overall health and wellness including enhancing mental health and self-esteem, providing a sense of belonging and purpose, and holding us accountable when our schedule becomes a little less structured.

Making new friends is not always as easy as it sounds, but there are opportunities abound for nearly everyone these days—especially in today’s connected world.

  • Take advantage of community events. Retirement communities provide many classes, performances, and outings at little to no cost, often with transportation included.
  • Get online. If distance or transportation is an issue, connect with friends via FaceTime, Skype, Facebook, or other digital mediums.
  • Volunteer your time. Giving back stimulates many different aspects of personal wellness, and helps to support great causes, as well!
  • Share your interests and expertise. If you can’t find something to join, consider teaching a class or starting a club of your own, which will likely draw in those with similar interests. As you’re getting out and participating in different events, consider those who may be feeling isolated and extend an invitation! A kind gesture goes far and will likely be reciprocated in the future to further cultivate your own social wellness.

Enjoying your collections

Recently I heard that young people today don’t really collect things. That’s not the case for those of us from earlier decades. Over the years, we’ve collected memorabilia. Snowmen, dolls, trains, dishes, quilts, teacups, photos, and much more bog down our closets, attics, and minds. But with every added item comes added responsibility. We must pay for it, know where it is, store it, dust it, and insure it. This can be exhausting and expensive!

There comes a time when for whatever the reason, our collections begin to be neglected. Instead of regretting this moment, we must allow ourselves the freedom to find new homes for these special items. Good homes can often be found online or by putting the word out to friends who would appreciate the treasures and continue to celebrate them. Museums and private collectors can be ecstatic to care for (and perhaps even purchase) your items.

As organizing consultants, we are often helping clients “give well” and part with belongings thoughtfully. Careful “rehoming” of collections brings relief and even pride to those who are simplifying, knowing they’re sharing their passion with others. After trimming the volume of your collections, prioritize your favorites so you can actually enjoy them. Hang those legacy quilts on the back of your couch or on the wall. Proudly display your grandmother’s teacups. And please: use the good china!

Vicki Norris, president of Restoring Order®, is a nationally recognized organizing expert, author, and speaker. Her team of professional organizers serves home and business clients in Washington and Oregon. You can watch her organizing segments on KPTV’s Fox 12 More Good Day Oregon. Visit RestoringOrder.com for more information.

Lead an enriched life this year!

At the start of a new year, we look ahead at what’s to come and consider what we’d like to change from the year before. What do you want to accomplish this year?

No matter your age or situation, it’s never too late to make a change—and there are many simple things we can all do to enhance our personal wellness and feel good today and every day!

While working toward making a change, it can often be valuable to think of our goal as a habit we wish to permanently incorporate into our lifestyle, rather than something with a specific end mark.

Here are a few ideas to consider incorporating into your daily routine:

  • Drink a full glass of water first thing each morning. Get hydrated and get a fresh start.
  • Set a mantra or plan for each day. Begin your day with a goal in mind, no matter how small or simple it may be.
  • Move as much as you can. Set a timer to move around or at least change position every 30 to 60 minutes each day.
  • Do a good deed for someone else. When someone does a good deed for you, instead of paying them back, pay it forward. A selfless act feels good to giver and recipient, and can help inspire kindness in others, as well!

Cultivating a general sense of wellness can help us feel our best and have more energy to spend on what makes us happy. Focusing on ourselves throughout the year means that we can approach each new milestone with confidence.

Reclaim your space! Restoring order to the family room

One of the best features of any home is the family room—precisely because of the loved ones it convenes! It’s a gathering space, an entertainment den, and a respite from the demands of life.

It can also become a magnet for “everything else.” Our handbags, catalogs, projects, paperwork, pet supplies, reading materials, and media can pile up and add to visual “noise.” This visual clutter detracts from the restfulness of the space.

To retain the respite of this essential space:

  • Define the purpose of the room, including what activities you will do here
  • List the types of items that land here and get stuck
  • Determine whether all those items need to live there or could live in a nearby location
  • Find a new location for items that don’t serve the purpose of the family room
  • Establish a work center somewhere else to eliminate creeping paperwork
  • Create a routing system to whisk away landed items at the end of each night

I also find that occasionally rearranging the furniture and swapping out blankets and pillows seasonally can keep this main thoroughfare fresh and inviting.

Enjoy your orderly family room and especially the ones in it!
For an entire chapter on family room organizing, get my room-by-room organizing book Restoring Order to Your Home.

Vicki Norris, president of Restoring Order®, is a nationally recognized organizing expert, author, and speaker. Her team of professional organizers serves home and business clients in Washington and Oregon. You can watch her organizing segments on KPTV’s Fox 12 More Good Day Oregon. Visit RestoringOrder.com for more information.

Maintaining healthy habits during the holidays

The holidays are a time of gathering with friends and family to show gratitude, share a meal, and spend quality time together. In the midst of celebrating, it’s easy to let healthy habits slip and find ourselves indulging in sweets, drinks, and heavy meals.

But there are easy ways to maintain healthy habits during this busy time and still enjoy all that the holidays have to offer. Here are some tips for continuing the diet and exercise routines established throughout the year at special meals or holiday parties:

Find balance. If you overindulge on one meal, eat lighter on the next. Consider following the 80/20 rule: eat healthier foods for 80 percent of the day and enjoy a special meal or dessert for 20 percent of the day.

Eat until satisfied, not full. By sticking with normal-sized portions, you can enjoy the delectable treats of the season without overeating. If you’re still feeling hungry after 20 minutes, it’s OK to go back for seconds.

Choose your favorite treats. If pie is your favorite dessert, have a slice! But avoid piling other types of desserts on your plate just because they’re available.

Stick to your exercise routines. Even with a busier schedule during the holidays, it’s especially important to continue with regular exercise schedules to balance out the extra calories.

Don’t get discouraged! If you overindulge, simply get back on track. Try to reduce your intake as the holidays wind down to get back into your normal routine. Add more exercise if possible to burn more calories.

Being mindful about your approach to eating during the holidays can help make it a happy and healthy season whose effects you won’t have to worry about in the new year!

Cultivating a JOY{FULL} holiday season

The end of the year is a time of togetherness and reflection. As we spend time with family and friends, we often think back on what the year has brought us, and what we have to look forward to in the new year.

But with age, the holidays can sometimes trigger feelings of sadness and anger as we think about those no longer with us or health conditions that keep us from celebrating the same way we did in years past.

No matter your situation, there are ways for everyone to celebrate the season and get in the holiday spirit:

  • Share stories and look through old photo albums. Telling younger generations about your past experiences can help bring families closer together and honor those who have passed.
  • Be reasonable with your schedule. Don’t agree to attend too much if you think it will tire you. Conversely, if you’re feeling like you don’t have much planned for the holidays, consider volunteering to give back and surround yourself with like-minded people.
  • Stick to your routines. With a lot going on, it’s easy to slip up on certain habits, but following your regular exercise program and eating healthfully (in moderation!) can help you continue to feel your best.

Keep in mind that the best way to spend the holidays is doing what feels right for you. Enjoy the season!

Meet Bill and Carolyn Hines

“Have fun, will travel” is their motto
Planes, Trains & Automobiles is a popular movie, but if you add a motorcycle, you get a good idea about how Carolyn and Bill Hines like to spend their time.

They fly across the country in their own plane. They drive their snazzy Subaru BRZ. They sail on Lake Hefner, and Bill tools around on his motorcycle. They have traveled in Europe, partly by train. They have also ridden the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad between Chama, New Mexico, and Antonito, Colorado, and the White Pass Scenic Railway out of Skagway, Alaska.

Along with traveling, Carolyn (73) and Bill (74) are deeply committed to community service. Their long list of volunteer activities includes helping at the Oklahoma History Center, ushering at the Civic Center, and spending time with WhizKids, an after-school program connecting under-served Oklahoma City children with mentors to build reading skills, confidence, and moral character.

Each is active physically. They enjoy hiking; the couple have hiked to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, spent the night at Phantom Ranch, and hiked back up the next day. They skied in Colorado and New Mexico for over 40 years. Carolyn has practiced yoga for many years.

They retired about a decade ago as longtime civil servants at Tinker AFB, he in human resources recruiting engineers and she as a program controller. “We’re native Oklahomans, and we wanted to remain in the Oklahoma City area, where our four children live,” says Carolyn.

Search leads to Parkview
The Hines had wanted to downsize for a while from their northwest Oklahoma City home and only became serious about it over the last two years. The couple wanted to make the decision as to where they would live before a health crisis might require their children to make it for them. “It’s part of planning for old age,” Bill says matter-of-factly.

Their children appreciated their forethought and agreed moving to a retirement community was a “wise decision.”

So the search began. “We visited several,” says Carolyn. “Some were more like a hotel, where the people seemed to be very quiet and not as outgoing and welcoming as the people living in Touchmark. Others were welcoming, and the residents seemed to be having a good time, but the houses were not as nice as those in Parkview. But it was the people living at Touchmark who caught our attention.”

Bill agrees. “They were so friendly. Touchmark seemed to be the friendliest, had the most fun activities, and had really interesting people. Every time we sat down, someone was talking to us.”

Rescue dogs play a role in decision
They knew they wanted to choose their floor plan and build a home from scratch. Then there was Coco and Gidget to consider. They needed a fenced yard with room to run and play. “The nearby Coffee Creek neighborhood trails are wonderful,” says Carolyn. “We can walk the dogs almost every day. Parkview is perfect.” They also like how close Parkview’s gazebo is to their home. “It’s on the other side of our backyard, and is such a comfortable setting!”

The close proximity to the YMCA at Mitch Park was a plus for Carolyn, as well, who is highly committed to yoga classes there.

The parties also attracted the couple. Oktoberfest, with its German beer and pastries, was a favorite for Bill. “We never felt alone. Someone would always stop and ask where we were from,” he says.

“Touchmark’s a fun place,” says Carolyn. “It’s nice to not have to do the yard, to not have to get a cleaning lady. Everything is just kind of convenient and carefree.”

Whether taking a road trip, flying somewhere, or staying put in their new home, carefree and fun best describe these Parkview neighbors.

Employee Profile: Chris Bullard

Executive Chef, Touchmark on Saddle Drive

Chris joined the Touchmark team in 2015 seeking an opportunity to grow as an Executive Chef and work with a different population. Since then he has learned the inner workings of serving residents and how to listen to them to create unique menus that take into account their diverse needs and preferences.

What keeps you at Touchmark?

The strong sense of camaraderie among residents and staff.

What is your favorite part of the day?

At the end of the day, I know we have made a difference in residents’ lives.

What is your favorite dish to make?

It’s a toss-up between a good Hungarian goulash or chicken and dumplings. When cooking for residents, I enjoy making our surf-and-turf dinner: USDA choice roasted and carved beef tenderloin and cilantro lime shrimp satay with seasoned asparagus, baked potato, and baklava for dessert.

If you could describe Touchmark in one word, what would it be?

Progressive.

Rocket science—just one of her many passions

tafv-dorothysmithKeeping a sharp mind and an active lifestyle helps us feel more vibrant. Dorothy Smith’s extensive knowledge and seemingly endless energy are definitely key contributors to her enriched lifestyle. Her favorite subject? Science!

Dorothy’s lifetime love of learning, science, math, and travel has helped her lead a very interesting and full life. Her first job, right out of college, was with an oil company. She and her colleagues were brought contour maps, seismographs, and local data from an area. Their job was to combine the data and try to find oil.

“We made these maps that looked very similar to weather maps,” Dorothy remembers. “And then we’d try and make educated guesses on where oil could be. I liked that job a lot, because there was something exciting when you did all your calculations right.”

Dorothy worked that job while her soon-to-be husband fought in World War II. They had had plans of going to medical school together, but when the war ended, Dorothy had graduated. They were married, and he returned to school. So she started teaching math at a couple of universities until she found a job working at the US Naval Research Laboratory in Wisconsin. There, she worked with a small group of men and women doing calculations for an atomic scientist.

“There was a scientist working on Flame Theory for ramjets. We were the computers, since back then we didn’t have computers like now. We did all the paper calculations and statistics, basically backing up what he was trying to prove.”

Traveling the world
Dorothy also worked for many years with the Friendship Force International, an organization that strives to build a world of peace through adult foreign-exchange programs. She’d spend a week or so with a family, go to work with them, learn bits of their language, and experience life with them. She participated in trips to Colombia, Korea, Germany, Russia, China, Japan, up the Amazon, all over the US and Canada, and to nearly countless destinations all over the world. “I loved traveling. I’ve been to all seven continents, including Antarctica, and to every state and province in the US and Canada.”

These days, Dorothy likes to watch videos and take online courses on subjects in the medical science field. She “picks up a class or two” on anatomy, physiology, and neurology. “Just fun courses to keep my mind sharp!” She also enjoys learning about astronomy and watching the sun, moon, and stars from her deck.

“Before I moved to Touchmark, I would drag my lawn furniture out at all times in the middle of the night and gaze at the stars. My daughters actually got me a star for my 90th birthday. There’s a star named after me in the Orion constellation.”

In addition to continuing her learning, Dorothy stays involved with church groups and was recently awarded a Lifetime Service Award by the Friends of Hospice organization. She also enjoys “always finding something fun to do at Touchmark,” and going on outings with friends.

“I’ve had a great time getting settled in Touchmark. It’s such a nice, homey feeling here. I’ve recommended Touchmark to lots of people.”