Breathing toward a better life

Breath is essential to life. Each person will take about half a billion breaths in their lifetime, most of which are taken without thinking. But focusing on the breath and bringing awareness to it can be a valuable tool in connecting the mind and body.

Our thoughts are connected to our breath, and can be used to influence the way the body behaves through simple exercises. A deep breath tells the body to calm down and encourages full oxygen exchange to keep the heartbeat steady.

For example, stressful thoughts trigger the release of “fight or flight” hormones that then increase blood pressure and heart rate and constrict blood vessels. Deep breathing can reverse this response by increasing blood flow and oxygenation to organs and muscles, thus reducing the damage caused by stress.

The benefits of a regular practice of deep breathing can include:

  • Reduce anxiety, depression, and stress
  • Lower/stabilize blood pressure
  • Increase energy levels
  • Relax muscles

Practicing deep breathing doesn’t have to be complicated. To try, find a quiet, comfortable place to sit or lie down. Breathe in through the nose, slowly, allowing the chest and abdomen to expand. Then breathe out slowly through the nose or mouth.

You may find it comforting to close your eyes or even to focus on a word or phrase to help you relax. Many also combine deep breathing with practices that promote it, including meditation, yoga, tai chi, or repetitive prayer.

A daily practice of deep breathing is one of the most effective tools for enhancing your health and producing long-term benefits. Try to practice for 15 – 20 minutes each day. Over time, these techniques can become more natural for your body and breathing will be more effective.

Preparing for flu season

The seasonal flu is a viral infection affecting the nose, throat, and lungs, and with the change in seasons, it’s essential to take preventative steps to protect yourself and your loved ones.

For many, the flu is a serious nuisance—and for some, it can develop into a serious illness that can lead to hospitalization and even death. Those at the highest risk for serious flu complications include:

  • Pregnant women
  • Children under the age of 5
  • Adults age 65 and older
  • People with health conditions such as asthma or diabetes

The most effective way to prevent the flu is by getting a flu vaccine. Flu vaccines may be administered as a shot or a nasal spray and are available at many different locations, such as your doctor’s office, clinic, pharmacy, or employer. They are covered under the Affordable Care Act as well as Medicare Part B.

In addition to the flu vaccine, listed below are other steps you can take to help prevent the seasonal flu.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • If you do get sick, stay at home for at least 24 hours after your fever has subsided.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Practice general good health habits, such as cleaning and disinfecting surfaces at home, drinking plenty of fluids, and eating a healthy and balanced diet.

Taking action to prevent the flu can help ensure you have the best season ever!

A message on massage

We often think of massage therapy as a spa-like indulgence to help us relax and relieve stress, but this ancient practice has plenty of health benefits. It can be a valuable form of treatment for a variety of conditions, while also helping us feel younger, healthier, and more balanced.

The benefits of massage therapy are vast! Depending on each individual, massage can help:

  • Relieve pain
  • Improve range of motion
  • Enhance immunity
  • Increase joint flexibility
  • Alleviate symptoms of depression and anxiety
  • Relax injured, tired, and overused muscles
  • Release endorphins—the body’s natural painkillers

Different types of massage can help serve different purposes, each utilizing different types of movement and levels of pressure.

Massage for older adults tends to differ from traditional massage practices, and usually includes gentle stroking, kneading, and light pressure on specific points. Targeted pressure can help lubricate joints, which relieves the pain and stiffness of arthritis. And the relaxation and communication promoted during massage can even help people living with Alzheimer’s disease.

Unlike many medications, massage is a natural way to stimulate the nervous system and increase blood circulation. In fact, according to Massage Today, regular massage can often help reduce the need for medications.

Massage therapy can benefit most people; however, it may not be appropriate for those with bleeding disorders or who are taking blood-thinning medication; people with deep vein thrombosis; or when you have open or healing burns or wounds.

Speak to your doctor before scheduling your first massage.

This season, strive for wellness in every dimension

With changes in the weather often come changes in how we feel, whether that means feeling cold, feeling sadness, or simply feeling different than the previous week. Whatever we’re feeling, overall wellness is important for optimal health. The following tips can help us make sure our wellness is in top shape!

To improve your emotional wellness

Practice optimism. Read books that interest you, and spend time with family and friends. Manage stress by setting boundaries, laughing, smiling, and hugging.

To improve your environmental wellness

Respect resources by choosing green processes. Seek ways to spend time in natural settings through walking paths, meditation, gardening, and similar options

To improve your intellectual wellness

Read. Challenge your brain with games. Learn new skills, and share and discuss your interests with others.

To improve your occupational wellness

Pursue interests. Contribute your passion or hobby in a paid or volunteer role. Recognize the value of your contribution, and get involved in your community.

To improve your physical wellness

Engage in regular physical activity, get adequate sleep, and have regular health checkups. Get a massage, eat a variety of healthy foods, and ask your doctor which vitamins might benefit you. (These things will also help your emotional wellness!)

To improve your social wellness

Listen to and care for others. Touch, hug, and laugh. Develop and nurture close, warm friendships. Join a club or an organization.

To improve your spiritual wellness

Live with a sense of purpose, guided by personal values. Participate in group or individual faith-based activities, meditation, or mindful exercises (tai chi, Qigong, yoga).

Practice wellness every day for the healthiest you!

Focus on health all hours of the day (and night)

While being active, exercising regularly, and eating a balanced diet are often touted as the keys to a healthy lifestyle, the amount and quality of your sleep is just as important.

Getting enough sleep provides valuable benefits for both our minds and bodies, as it can affect our immune system, appetite, hormone levels, blood pressure, and more.

As people age, falling asleep and staying asleep can become more of a struggle, and the prevalence of insomnia rises, as well. This can be caused by changes in circadian rhythms, hormone levels, lifestyle habits, or effects from medications.

However, sleep needs remain the same throughout adulthood—seven to nine hours per night. A lack of quality sleep each night can lead to reduced productivity, daytime sleepiness, depression, increased risk of obesity, and other health concerns.

There are certain practices you can follow to help fall asleep faster and get quality sleep each night:

  • Go to bed and get up at the same time every day.
  • Do not nap for longer than 20 minutes.
  • Use your bed only for sleeping. Do not read, snack, or watch television in bed.
  • Avoid nicotine and alcohol in the evenings.
  • Talk to your doctor about medications that may be keeping you awake at night, such as antidepressants, beta-blockers, and cardiovascular drugs.

Taking care of yourself at night can help your daytime hours be safer, healthier, and more enjoyable.

Is it time for a change?

Getting older and entering retirement age often means having more time to spend on activities we enjoy and having the free time to travel and spend time with friends and family. But it also means that we need to be aware of how our bodies are changing, and that our need for care will likely increase.

As the adult child of an older adult, it can be difficult knowing when it’s time step in and help a loved one increase their level of care. However, there are things to be aware of that can help you know when it may be time to intervene.

When visiting your loved one, try to be aware of these possible indicators:
    • Physical changes like sudden weight loss, bruises, or reduced personal grooming
    • Increased difficulty with everyday activities like cooking, bathing, and dressing
    • Risky behavior like poor medication management, keeping old/spoiled food in the refrigerator, inability to care for a pet, or hiding falls
    • Emotional changes such as unusual or unexplained depression, stress, or anxiety; a lack of enthusiasm for normal activities; and less contact with friends and family
    • Cognitive changes like forgetting names of familiar people; not paying bills; dents in the car; unopened mail or packages; and difficulty remembering to shop, cook, or eat

If you determine that extra help is needed, an inclusive care community can often be the best solution. With this type of care, only the level of help that is needed is provided, but as the need becomes greater over time, the level of care is also increased. This is the ideal solution for people wishing to “age in place.”

Being the healthiest we can and living happy, satisfied lives requires comfort and certainty in the health care we receive. By monitoring the health of our loved ones, we can make sure these concerns are provided for as early as possible!

 

Seven Dimensions for Full Living

As we age, experts agree it is essential that we stay physically active. But many don’t realize there are several other factors that add up to healthy wholeness. In fact, living a full and satisfied life means overall “wellness,” which is defined by more than physical well-being.

In 1976, Dr. Bill Hettler, co-founder of the National Wellness Institute, developed a six-dimensional model for achieving wellness. According to Dr. Hettler’s model, by focusing on and balancing each of these factors, a more complete form of wellness could be achieved.

In the years since Dr. Hettler made his discovery, a variety of organizations, from universities to health care professionals, have adopted these dimensions. And in the years following, a seventh dimension has been added.

The seven dimensions of wellness are:

  • Emotional: Being aware of feelings and coping with challenges in a respectful way signals emotional wellness and helps create a balance in life.
  • Physical: Healthy lifestyle choices can help maintain or improve health and function.
  • Spiritual: Living with a sense of purpose in life and being guided by personal values is key to our well-being and connection to the larger world and others.
  • Occupational: Utilizing our skills and passion, while cultivating personal satisfaction, is valuable to both society and the individual.
  • Intellectual: Engaging in intellectually stimulating activities is a proven approach to maintaining cognitive function.
  • Social: Positive social support has a protective influence on our health and well-being.
  • Environmental: Living with a greater awareness of the world allows us to begin to make environmentally friendly choices.

The dimensions in action

At Touchmark, the seven dimensions of wellness are an essential part of the Full Life Wellness & Life Enrichment Program™. This award-winning program identifies people’s strengths, skills, needs, interests, and goals to help them lead happy, healthy, and full lives.

By focusing on each dimension, individuals become aware of the dimensions’ interconnectedness and how they contribute to overall health. And the dimensions can be applied in multiple ways to nearly every area of daily activity. For example, going on a hike with friends combines aspects of the physical, social, and environmental, but may also involve the spiritual, emotional, and even the occupational and intellectual, depending on conversations, thoughts, and experiences. The same dimensions may interact in a variety of ways when we go on a picnic, play a game of pickleball, or visit a museum.

Touchmark’s Health & Fitness Club can help by offering residents a firm foundation in the physical that can be easily added onto with other elements like the mental, in classes like yoga, and the social, intellectual, and more in group fitness classes and other group activities in the heated pool.

In order to provide a plethora of opportunities for these kinds of interdimensional crossovers, Touchmark uses its Full Life Wellness & Life Enrichment Program and the seven dimensions to craft daily diverse and creative events and activities that often go beyond what some might expect from a retirement community.

“Residents may find themselves on a seven-day train trip through California, digging in at our old-fashioned clam bake, or enjoying the sights of Touchmark’s annual Father’s Day Weekend Classic Car Show,” says Touchmark at Meadow Lake Village Executive Director Matthew Hoskin. “By carefully listening to what people are interested in, we’re able to offer residents a lifestyle that’s not only fun, enriching, and engaging, but also includes all the elements of wellness.”

Touchmark believes that a full life is available to anyone—no matter one’s age—and its Full Life program ensures all residents have the unique tools, opportunities, and community support to bring their personal vision to life.

Meet Jim Nelson and Marilyn Ring-Nelson

Living their “full-to-bursting” life

At Touchmark, residents experience the full life. Marilyn Ring-Nelson laughs heartily as she says, “It’s not just the ‘full’ life. It’s the ‘full-to-bursting’ life! There is so much to do here!”

Prior to living at Touchmark, Jim Nelson would have described himself as being quite content with the title “the less social one” in the family. He says, “I didn’t really enjoy meeting new people or going out much. What I didn’t expect was that changing after moving here.” Now, when Marilyn asks if he’s interested in doing an activity, Jim usually says without hesitation, “That sounds like fun!”

Time for the next chapter

Married for 35 years, Jim and Marilyn enjoy walking and traveling, and they are avid readers and book lovers! Before their love of books turned into love for one another, Jim had lived in Reno. For years, he was a political reporter and sports editor for the Reno Evening Gazette. He was also a driver for the Washoe County Library’s Bookmobile.

Marilyn, meanwhile, had built a 33-year career working as a librarian at the Seattle Public Library. She managed the Bookmobile department in her last 15 years prior to retirement.

It was in that role that Marilyn interviewed Jim for a job. He initially turned down the offer, opting instead to ask Marilyn out on a date. Eventually, he started working at the library, holding several positions including Branch Clerical Supervisor, Library Associate, and Bookmobile Driver.

Two years ago on the road home after attending her eighth-grade school reunion, the couple looked at each other and said, “We don’t want to go back to Seattle.” Getting places took longer because of increased traffic. “This made getting together with friends or enjoying an evening at a restaurant or concert more difficult, says Marilyn, who was born and raised in Spokane.

Unlike some older adults who relocate to be closer to family (often grandchildren), Jim and Marilyn moved to Touchmark in Spokane, even though their family, which includes four children, three grandchildren, and a great-grandson, are still living on the west side of the state.

Jim says they researched several retirement communities; once they visited Touchmark, “We simply knew. This is where we want to be.”

Jumping into new adventures

As Marilyn puts it, “The day we arrived, we plunged into life here at Touchmark, because we didn’t have any other distractions. We didn’t know anyone, so we were kind of forced to do activities to meet people.”

They love the mix of social opportunities they have enjoyed. The list is lengthy and includes the Ping-Pong® Tournament, Mardi Gras, numerous restaurant outings, Happy Hour, exercise classes, the workout room, shopping trips, and a day excursion to Palouse Falls, to name just a few. Every Thursday, both enjoy attending Cottage Coffee Hour with other cottage residents. Typically, the men and women separate into groups, with each chatting about their interests. This fall, they’ll take part in their boldest social activity to date: a trip to Cape Cod with others from Touchmark. The couple couldn’t be more excited!

Social cheerleaders

Marilyn is the more outgoing of the pair, but it was Jim who attended Touchmark’s annual Harvest Festival, where residents line the hallways to pass out candy to hundreds of neighborhood kids in costume and help at a mini carnival. Jim loved it so much, he says, “I’m insisting Marilyn joins me this year!”

The enthusiasm the pair have for their lives at Touchmark is infectious. Jim admits moving felt a bit risky, but says it all worked out. “In our day-to-day life here, we wake up happy. We both look forward to almost everything there is to do here. We’ll try everything!”

Marilyn nods in agreement, adding, “There’s something to do almost all the time!”

Have you seen what healthy vision’s all about?

You know having a healthy diet and getting plenty of exercise are important to living a long, healthy life. But did you know those factors contribute to your eye health, too?

Eyes are our windows into the world, and having clear vision is important for building beautiful memories. That’s one reason why eye health is worth seriously looking into.

Here are a few tips for keeping those peepers popping!

Get regular eye exams – comprehensive dilated eye exams allow your eye doctor to look deep within your orbs, making it easier to catch certain diseases early.

Wear sunglasses – wearing shades protects your eyes from the sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays, which can cause devastating cataracts, macular degeneration, and astigmatism-causing pterygiums. Plus, they look cool!

Use protective eyewear – wearing safety glasses will help keep foreign objects from piercing your eyes. If you’re a home woodworker or metal smith, or just a particularly zealous duster, keeping your eyes debris free is essential to healthy sight.

Know your family history – did anybody from your past have a history of eye issues? Your eye color is hereditary and so are some eye diseases. Knowing your family history can help you develop a plan of eye health action!

An Organized Move – Part 1

Since the secret of a stress-free move is in the forethought, I will dedicate this first article to the critical planning process. Here are some of the first things our professional organizers establish for our moving clients:

Make an accordion file to manage all the paperwork for both the home you’re selling and the home you’re buying (one for each). These documents include: Realtor agreements, sales and purchase agreements, disclosures, inspection reports, title documents, assessments, comparative market analysis, correspondence, sales expense receipts, and anything else that establishes the value of your home and your title to it.

Set communication and performance expectations with your real estate representative(s).  A little communication up-front about your desires and needs will go a long way. Express what you need in terms of frequency and forms of communication.

Develop a list of repairs and cosmetic improvements that will improve individual spaces. Once you have your repairs-to-be-made list, you can set dates on your calendar to execute the work, and begin making appointments with professionals to fix the things that require special skill or materials. This list should be prioritized by importance. Consult with industry professionals to determine which improvements will give you the most “bang for your buck” in your particular market, and then assign a budget to each item based on its priority. Be sure to get quotes in writing from service providers and check references.

Create a master schedule spreadsheet that includes packing, cleaning, repairs and remodels, and coordinating details at both locations. You can also just add dates to your current calendar if that’s easier for you.

Whether you’re upsizing or downsizing, and no matter what season of life you’re in, invest the time now to ensure you can stay organized during the process.

 

About the author:

Restoring Order founder Vicki Norris

Vicki Norris is a professional organizing expert, dynamic entrepreneur, speaker, television personality, and author who helps people live their priorities. Founder and president of Restoring Order®, an organizing services and products company, Norris teaches others how to identify their priorities and create sustainable change in personal organizational habits that support those choices.

This article and others are available on Vicki Norris’ website at http://www.restoringorder.com/.