Staying active is key to enjoying life

Joan Schnettler is all about being active. Whether it’s attending exercise class, taking computer classes, connecting with people around the world through her iPad, participating in Life Enrichment/Wellness programs, or going on Touchmark-sponsored trips, she’s always on the move.

“I really believe that you need to keep moving and stay active. You also need to exercise your mind just like you would your body,” says Joan, who has lived in a Touchmark home for the past six-and-a-half years.

After moving to Touchmark, she jumped in and immediately got involved in various activities. She walks to the Grande, the main building, for programs and the different classes. She also walks a mile each day, either outside or in the Grande. This is in addition to her exercise classes five days a week—three days of strength training and two days of aerobics.

As someone who likes to be on the go, Joan relishes Touchmark’s different trips. It doesn’t matter if it’s a day visit to The Fireside Theater in Fort Atkinson to see a play or an overnight trip; Joan is on board. “I love how they extend my horizons,” she says.

Enduring love
Joan and her husband Jerry were best friends and married for 63 years. After the war, the couple settled in Milwaukee, where they lived for 45 years. An electrical engineer, Jerry built a career with Milwaukee Electric Tool Corporation, ultimately serving as president.

Joan, meanwhile, was a master homemaker and focused her talents on nurturing the couple’s children. Following retirement, she and Jerry spent the winters in Florida and summers at their lake home in Minocqua, Wisconsin.

“We moved to Touchmark to be closer to some family,” says Joan, who especially appreciated the support of others after Jerry passed away two-and-a-half years ago.

Keeping in touch with technology
Joan welcomes all of today’s technology. “It’s wonderful,” enthuses Joan when she talks about getting texts from her loved ones. “I bought an iPad and am going to the technology classes Touchmark offers to learn more about how to use the iPad. You can’t stop learning,” she says.

Attending the technology and other classes Touchmark offers allows Joan to expand her knowledge about a rich array of topics—and share laughter and learning with others.

“It’s a great way to be social. I love living here. I can have my own house, but yet I can go over to the main building for meals as well as all the programs,” says Joan. “I don’t want to just stay home and be a hermit.”

An advocate of whole-person wellness, Joan devotes time each day to attend mass.

She also enjoys exercising her brain by playing bridge, both online with people from around the world and with other residents at Touchmark.

“I really enjoy the people I meet at the different programs as well as on the trips,” she says.

“It is really a lot of fun.”

This couple has walked in all 50 states and eight foreign countries

Meet Catharine and Bill ByrdMeet Catharine and Bill Byrd
This couple has walked in all 50 states and eight foreign countries

Catharine and Bill Byrd have always shared a love of travel—especially on their own two feet. In addition to each state in America, the couple has participated in walks in Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, Germany, Japan, Denmark, and Luxembourg.

Bill’s career offered him various job opportunities, which eventually relocated the family to Vancouver, Washington. That’s where the couple discovered their passion for Volkswalking.

“I was a dedicated mall-walker at that time,” recalls Catharine. “One day, out of curiosity, I attended a talk on Volkswalking. I went home and told Bill this was something we might like to try.”

So they tried it, says Catharine, “And we were hooked!”

“When Bill traveled for business,” she recalls, “we’d stay a few days longer and do 10-kilometer (6.2 miles) Volkswalks in the nearby states.”

Bill adds, “We did enough walking to keep our weekends busy for a number of years.”

The couple has now logged official Volkswalks in all 50 states and in the process seen some gorgeous scenery. “Volkswalking is a great way to see the country, because you see the little things that you miss when you’re zipping by in a car,” says Bill.

The Byrds became charter members in a Volkswalking group that began over 15 years ago in Vancouver. The club is still active, but Bill and Catharine tend to take shorter walks on their own these days or head out with a Touchmark walking group.

From Alabama to Washington
Both Catharine and Bill were born and raised in Alabama.

When Bill was just 18, the US was pulled into World War II, and he joined the Army. “I wound up in the infantry,” he says, “so that was really the start of my walking. Bill remained in the Army Reserves for 21 years, serving in both Europe and Asia.

After he returned from service, Bill enrolled in Auburn University in Alabama, where he met and married Catharine.

In those days, it was common for women to leave college once they were married, so Catharine dropped out of school while her husband finished his degree in Chemical Engineering. Later, Catharine returned to school and got her degree in Accounting at the University of Portland.

Right out of school, Bill landed a job at a foundry in Alabama. Soon, though, he and the family were transferred to southern California, and then to Columbus, Indiana. While there, he took a job with a competitor and relocated to Vancouver, Washington, where he and Catharine have lived for the last 40 years.

After earning her Accounting degree in their new home, Catharine taught in a business school. “Then I used my degree to volunteer in a lot of organizations, including our church as treasurer for almost nine years.”

The Byrds raised a daughter and three sons. They now boast seven grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren. The whole family gets together at least once a year.

Opting for easier living
A few years ago, the Byrds decided it was time for them to let go of the chore of maintaining their own home and yard.

“We already belonged to the Touchmark Health & Fitness Club, so we knew people here, and we were familiar with Touchmark.”

Still, they did their research and looked at other retirement communities in the area. In the end, they chose Touchmark.

“We liked the light and open feeling here at Touchmark when you walk in the front doors,” says Catharine. “And the people here are great.”

Bill chimes in, “And now we don’t have to drive crosstown to the fitness club; we just ride down the elevator.”

The Byrds originally moved into a Terrace apartment. When a larger apartment with more storage became available in the main building, they took it.

Staying physically and mentally active
Bill continues to take full advantage of Touchmark’s Health & Fitness Club. “I do yoga two days a week and work out on the machines the other three days,” he says. He especially likes using the pneumatic weight-lifting system and the rowing machine in his workouts.

Catharine used to take aerobic dance and now participates in the SAIL (Stay Active and Independent for Life) class three days a week.

Walking is still a favorite way for them to get their exercise between classes and workouts.

They also volunteer on various Touchmark committees. Catharine is head of the Dining Committee, while Bill volunteers on the Interior and Dining committees.

“There are a lot of activities here to participate in,” says Bill. “In fact,” he says with a smile, “it can put a bit of a strain on you trying to keep up with it all.”

Catharine laughs with her husband. “There’s certainly no reason to be bored here!”

Since they have lived in Vancouver for more than 40 years, they also keep active with people they knew before moving into Touchmark.

A philosophy to live by …
Catharine says, “I’ve always looked at my life in terms of stages: the Alabama Stage, the California Stage, and so forth. I try not to look back and regret things … You have to always look forward to the different phases of your life.”

Although the Byrds have many medals to show for their accomplishments, they still have much to look forward to—and do so with the same passion they always have.

Fascinated with the past—and living a full life

Meet Joyce and Jim HolterMeet Joyce and Jim Holter
Fascinated with the past—and living a full life

If you want to know anything about the 70-foot, world-famous Hjemkomst (Homecoming) Viking Ship or the replica Hopperstad Stave Kirke (church), Jim would be delighted to take you on a tour of The Hjemkomst Center, where he is a docent.

If you’d like to know more about genealogy and how to use a computer to research and record your own family history, Joyce is your expert.

On any given day, you could also find Joyce baking her special bread that the grandchildren call Grandma Bread or working on her computer helping
update the Touchmark resident story album. Jim is just as busy, practicing with the Touchmark choir and volunteering at Touchmark’s convenience store.

Their cottage home is inviting, warmly decorated to reflect their Scandinavian heritage.

To Fargo—and back again
Joyce was born and raised in Kindred, a small town in the same county as Fargo. She and Jim met at North Dakota State University, where Jim completed his undergraduate degree.

The couple soon married and moved to Ames, Iowa, where Jim earned a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine and a Master of Science in Veterinary Pathology at Iowa State University. While he was taking classes, Joyce worked in Student Services, learning to use a computer and build databases, a skill she has used her entire life.

After graduating in 1957, the couple moved to Casselton, North Dakota, where Jim was a practicing veterinarian for 15 years. They then returned to Ames, and Jim started a 20-year tenure as a professor at Iowa State University.

Also in that timeline, the couple raised four children—two girls and two boys—all of whom eventually graduated from Iowa State University.

“We retired young,” Jim says. “I was 61, and Joyce was 57.”

Their own hjemkomst (homecoming) eventually led them back to Fargo. Joyce says, “When it came time for us to retire, we came home to what was really home to us.”

A long-planned move
When they first retired, though, the Holters bought a home on a lake in Minnesota.

“At that time,” Jim recalls, “I said to Joyce, ‘When I turn 80, we’ll think about doing something different. And she held me to it!”

So when Jim turned 80, Joyce reminded her husband of his promise. “By that time,” Jim says, “I was getting tired of maintaining the lake home, mowing the lawn, taking care of the boat and dock … ”

Joyce continues. “When Touchmark had an open house, we went to look at their cottages.” And they both liked what they saw.

“Now,” says Joyce, “whenever we go and visit other folks in the community, we always come home and say, ‘Oh, we have the best place!'”

Jim adds, “We’ve lived in many homes, and this is about the most comfortable that we’ve ever lived in.”

Joyce, the genealogist, adds, “And after we moved in here, I found out that I have three third cousins living here, too! I could show you exactly how we are related!”

Enjoying each day to its fullest
Because both are half Norwegian (Jim is also part Dane), it is only natural that Joyce and Jim volunteer at The Hjemkomst Center at least one day a week. Joyce works in the business office, using her many computer skills, while Jim is a docent, guiding visitors through the maze of Scandinavian history. Joyce and Jim have traveled extensively, including three trips to Norway.

Jim just performed with the Touchmark Choir at the historic Fargo Theater. He practices with them every week, and they perform at area schools, other retirement communities, for a local Kiwanis Club, and for other residents. “What’s so unique about our choir,” says Jim, “is that the members range in
age from 22 to 101!”

Joyce spends a lot of time on her computer. “I have had a computer on my desk since 1976.” She learned to build databases early on, which has proved indispensable for her genealogy work, which she has been doing for over 25 years.

Joyce and Jim enjoy people and are very involved in the Touchmark community. “We love sharing stories and histories and believe everyone has a story.”

This couple share friendship, laughter—and technology

Meet Jim and Helen BastianMeet Helen and Jim Bastian
This couple share friendship, laughter—and technology

“We have two things to say,” Jim announces. “One, we laugh a lot. And, two, after 64 years together, we are still each other’s best friend.”

And what resonates between them echoes outward, as their laughter and friendliness touch everyone around them.

“You can’t believe all the wonderful people who live and work at Touchmark,” says Helen. “Everybody is so great. It is a very wonderful atmosphere here.”

Sharing rich and interesting backgrounds
Helen was born in Fargo, ND, then spent most of her childhood in Minnesota, going through the Moorehead public school system. In 1947, she graduated from the School of Chemistry at North Dakota Agricultural College (now NDSU). Then she entered Purdue University to pursue her master’s degree.

Jim was born and raised in Indianapolis, Ind. Soon after high school, he went into the Navy, enrolling in Radio Technician Radar School. In 1946, Jim entered Purdue University. He started out in Electrical Engineering but ended up with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology. He then went on to get his master’s and PhD in Physiology and Pharmacology.

Meanwhile, working on her master’s in chemistry, Helen met Jim. There must have been more than a little chemistry between them.

“We met at a football rally,” Jim remembers. “I walked right up to Helen, took her hand, and told her I was Jim. She told me she was Helen, and that started our relationship!” Jim and Helen both laugh heartily at the recollection. “It wasn’t like either one of us to act like that.”

It may have been a bit out of character for a couple of scientists, but the formula seemed to work. Helen and Jim married in 1950.

Supporting family and careers
“I never finished my master’s program,” says Helen. “After the war, with everyone returning home, I couldn’t renew my graduate assistant’s program, so I went into educational psychology.”

Jim chimes in, “Helen put me through my PhD program by working in a veterinary school as a lab technician.”

After that, Helen shifted her focus to making a home and raising their daughter and two sons. Once the  children were in school, she taught high school chemistry for more than eight years.

After Jim finished his PhD at Purdue in 1954, he joined Armour Pharmaceutical Company, working as a drug researcher for 32 years. Among his many successes, he helped lead the development of the first drug to relieve chronic pain caused by Paget’s disease of the bone.

When Jim retired in 1986, he continued doing consulting work with Armour and then with a Japanese company until 2000.

A passion for technology
Helen and Jim are fondly referred to as “early adopters” as they actively seek out the leading edge of technology.

Helen recently found herself one of only 100 people in the world who has an OrCam for home use. It is a tiny, smart camera for visually impaired people. Mounted to her glasses, her OrCam “sees” the book or newspaper page she is holding then orally “reads” it to her.

“Jim read about it in the New York Times before it was even available on the U.S. market,” Helen recalls. “We immediately got on a waiting list.”

When not using her OrCam, Helen is often on her iPad. She reads books on it, watches news programs, and looks up recipes. “You can find almost anything on an iPad.” She also uses it to keep track of her family— including their two great grandsons—on Facebook.

With wide-ranging interests, Jim has always been an inventor on the side. For instance, in 1967, he patented the first roller paint machine. More recently, he patented a new hold-bar attachment for treadmills. “I’ve made hundreds of inventions over the years,” Jim says, “but often found out someone else had beat me to the patent.”

Jim recently launched a new business. “I’m fully occupied with it,” he says. “I’m a true, honest-to-goodness, livewire entrepreneur … it’s exciting!”

In fact, Jim is completely absorbed with manufacturing and selling his latest invention: a device that “magically” attaches a cell phone to your arm or waist—on the outside of your clothing—via a strong magnet. “I have a minifactory and hundreds of products all ready to sell. It’s a 24-hour business.”

The business means Jim doesn’t have time to bake his famous cinnamon-craison bread anymore; however, he was recently elected to the Touchmark Resident Council. “I consider this a great honor, and it’s a lot of fun.”

Continuing their full lives
Moving to Touchmark has been a natural continuation of Helen and Jim’s full lives. What they enjoy most is the many opportunities for social interaction just beyond their front door.

“It’s so interesting to sit down and talk with any of these people,” says Jim. “Many of them were top in their fields. It’s unbelievable!”

“Such interesting stories!” adds Helen. “From farming stories to WWII pilots getting shot down!”

Other enjoyable activities are walking their miniature poodle Lucy and keeping close tabs on their great grandchildren. And laughing. “Yes, you could say laughter is our philosophy of life!”

Connecting through music

Family was the main draw for Stan Stewart when he moved to Touchmark. “I wanted to live closer to my son,” he says. When he and his son first visited Touchmark, he was impressed with the different levels of care available.

“It seemed like a good fit.” Once settled, he quickly grew to appreciate the community of people seeking social connection, something lacking where he had previously lived. “There, the residents had all grown up together, attended the same high school, and spent their whole lives there. It was hard. I have a lot more friends at Touchmark. The people here are more likely to make friends.”

Stan and his son Christopher, who plays flute, guitar, and piano, share a deep love of music, and the father and son attracted a large audience when they played in the Touchmark lobby. “The place was packed!”

Music was the path to a new friendship with Harry Kramer, who heard Stan singing, and the two men started talking about music. Harry, who started piano lessons at age 5 and has played keyboards for 30 years, says he’s impressed with the quality and range of Stan’s voice.

“I often accompanied my wife when we played at dances. She was a big hit when she played an electric bass guitar. She got the standing ovations, and I got all the sitting ovations,” Harry jokes.

Stan enjoys Harry’s sense of humor and says it’s better to perform with him than alone. The two now regularly play together, often treating residents to lively, toe-tapping performances.

Generations of music
Born in Kansas City, Missouri, Stan says his love of music grew from deep roots. His greatgrandfather played the fife in the Civil War. His grandfather played the flute. His father was in the military, so the family moved around a lot before settling in Modesto, California. “I learned how to play the guitar in college, but my true instrument is my voice.”

“I communicate with people through music,” he says, adding that he characterizes his music as more of an avocation than a full-time job. After studying economics at the University of California at Davis, Stan pursued a career in business that included insurance and estate planning, much of that time in Modesto.

Singing semiprofessionally
The road to performing in public started when he played some chords on a guitar at the insurance office where he worked. A coworker invited him to his house for band practice, and the other musicians asked him to sing with them for an Open Mic night.

“The next night I was the lead singer for a band.”

Stan says there are two kinds of music: country and western. “If it doesn’t tell a good story, I’m not interested in it.”

He often opened his shows with the Johnny Cash signature song Folsom Prison Blues. Stan croons the opening lines: “I hear the train a comin’. It’s rollin’ ‘round the bend. And I ain’t seen the sunshine since, I don’t know when.”

Travel time to gigs with bandmates was often spent singing so they were warmed up by the time they arrived. “Once we were done performing, we walked off the stage and divvied up the money.”

After entertaining for 10 years in Modesto, Stan now is part of a duet, having formed a friendship through a shared love of music. “Harry is very talented and knows many of the songs I like to sing. He’s got the talent, and I just sing along,”

Harry credits Stan with reviving his love of playing. Dealing with the grief of losing his wife of nearly 60 years was “the most horrible time.” He says the community of friends at Touchmark helped him to embrace the idea that “life is for the living.”

Today, Stan and Harry take pleasure sharing their musical talents with each other—and spreading the joy of music to others.

Stan and Harry

Meet Bill and Carolyn Hines

“Have fun, will travel” is their motto
Planes, Trains & Automobiles is a popular movie, but if you add a motorcycle, you get a good idea about how Carolyn and Bill Hines like to spend their time.

They fly across the country in their own plane. They drive their snazzy Subaru BRZ. They sail on Lake Hefner, and Bill tools around on his motorcycle. They have traveled in Europe, partly by train. They have also ridden the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad between Chama, New Mexico, and Antonito, Colorado, and the White Pass Scenic Railway out of Skagway, Alaska.

Along with traveling, Carolyn (73) and Bill (74) are deeply committed to community service. Their long list of volunteer activities includes helping at the Oklahoma History Center, ushering at the Civic Center, and spending time with WhizKids, an after-school program connecting under-served Oklahoma City children with mentors to build reading skills, confidence, and moral character.

Each is active physically. They enjoy hiking; the couple have hiked to the bottom of the Grand Canyon, spent the night at Phantom Ranch, and hiked back up the next day. They skied in Colorado and New Mexico for over 40 years. Carolyn has practiced yoga for many years.

They retired about a decade ago as longtime civil servants at Tinker AFB, he in human resources recruiting engineers and she as a program controller. “We’re native Oklahomans, and we wanted to remain in the Oklahoma City area, where our four children live,” says Carolyn.

Search leads to Parkview
The Hines had wanted to downsize for a while from their northwest Oklahoma City home and only became serious about it over the last two years. The couple wanted to make the decision as to where they would live before a health crisis might require their children to make it for them. “It’s part of planning for old age,” Bill says matter-of-factly.

Their children appreciated their forethought and agreed moving to a retirement community was a “wise decision.”

So the search began. “We visited several,” says Carolyn. “Some were more like a hotel, where the people seemed to be very quiet and not as outgoing and welcoming as the people living in Touchmark. Others were welcoming, and the residents seemed to be having a good time, but the houses were not as nice as those in Parkview. But it was the people living at Touchmark who caught our attention.”

Bill agrees. “They were so friendly. Touchmark seemed to be the friendliest, had the most fun activities, and had really interesting people. Every time we sat down, someone was talking to us.”

Rescue dogs play a role in decision
They knew they wanted to choose their floor plan and build a home from scratch. Then there was Coco and Gidget to consider. They needed a fenced yard with room to run and play. “The nearby Coffee Creek neighborhood trails are wonderful,” says Carolyn. “We can walk the dogs almost every day. Parkview is perfect.” They also like how close Parkview’s gazebo is to their home. “It’s on the other side of our backyard, and is such a comfortable setting!”

The close proximity to the YMCA at Mitch Park was a plus for Carolyn, as well, who is highly committed to yoga classes there.

The parties also attracted the couple. Oktoberfest, with its German beer and pastries, was a favorite for Bill. “We never felt alone. Someone would always stop and ask where we were from,” he says.

“Touchmark’s a fun place,” says Carolyn. “It’s nice to not have to do the yard, to not have to get a cleaning lady. Everything is just kind of convenient and carefree.”

Whether taking a road trip, flying somewhere, or staying put in their new home, carefree and fun best describe these Parkview neighbors.

Rocket science—just one of her many passions

tafv-dorothysmithKeeping a sharp mind and an active lifestyle helps us feel more vibrant. Dorothy Smith’s extensive knowledge and seemingly endless energy are definitely key contributors to her enriched lifestyle. Her favorite subject? Science!

Dorothy’s lifetime love of learning, science, math, and travel has helped her lead a very interesting and full life. Her first job, right out of college, was with an oil company. She and her colleagues were brought contour maps, seismographs, and local data from an area. Their job was to combine the data and try to find oil.

“We made these maps that looked very similar to weather maps,” Dorothy remembers. “And then we’d try and make educated guesses on where oil could be. I liked that job a lot, because there was something exciting when you did all your calculations right.”

Dorothy worked that job while her soon-to-be husband fought in World War II. They had had plans of going to medical school together, but when the war ended, Dorothy had graduated. They were married, and he returned to school. So she started teaching math at a couple of universities until she found a job working at the US Naval Research Laboratory in Wisconsin. There, she worked with a small group of men and women doing calculations for an atomic scientist.

“There was a scientist working on Flame Theory for ramjets. We were the computers, since back then we didn’t have computers like now. We did all the paper calculations and statistics, basically backing up what he was trying to prove.”

Traveling the world
Dorothy also worked for many years with the Friendship Force International, an organization that strives to build a world of peace through adult foreign-exchange programs. She’d spend a week or so with a family, go to work with them, learn bits of their language, and experience life with them. She participated in trips to Colombia, Korea, Germany, Russia, China, Japan, up the Amazon, all over the US and Canada, and to nearly countless destinations all over the world. “I loved traveling. I’ve been to all seven continents, including Antarctica, and to every state and province in the US and Canada.”

These days, Dorothy likes to watch videos and take online courses on subjects in the medical science field. She “picks up a class or two” on anatomy, physiology, and neurology. “Just fun courses to keep my mind sharp!” She also enjoys learning about astronomy and watching the sun, moon, and stars from her deck.

“Before I moved to Touchmark, I would drag my lawn furniture out at all times in the middle of the night and gaze at the stars. My daughters actually got me a star for my 90th birthday. There’s a star named after me in the Orion constellation.”

In addition to continuing her learning, Dorothy stays involved with church groups and was recently awarded a Lifetime Service Award by the Friends of Hospice organization. She also enjoys “always finding something fun to do at Touchmark,” and going on outings with friends.

“I’ve had a great time getting settled in Touchmark. It’s such a nice, homey feeling here. I’ve recommended Touchmark to lots of people.”

Meet June Hunter

“No more worries!”

When June Hunter decided to move to a new home in a new city, she didn’t quite know what to expect. But one year later and happier than ever, she continues to live her life to the fullest.

“I’m not just living a full life,” says June. “If you ask me, I feel like I’m living a full life-plus! And in a place that I’m proud to now call my home.”

With her grown daughters, their husbands, and her three grandchildren, June decided relocating near her family was important to her. It was through friends that she learned about Touchmark.

From Ontario to the prairies
Originally from Ontario, June lived there all of her life up until she met her husband, as he was attending his veterinarian studies at the University of Guelph.

“Harold was a prairie-boy at heart, so as soon as his studies were over, we decided to make the move to Regina, Saskatchewan.”

The couple moved to Saskatchewan in 1956, had two daughters, and worked together in their veterinary clinic.

“I have always liked to keep busy and was very involved in assisting with our business. I also served on the board of directors for the Regina Symphony and most of the committees at our church. Even now, I plan my day the night before, because I like knowing exactly what I am going to do the next day.”

After Harold passed away at a young age in 1982, June sold the family business and found work at a nursing home doing administrative work. After 10 years, she went to work in an Indian Artifacts Gallery for another 10 years.

“I have always loved art! In this job I was able to learn so many new things as I looked after collecting art pieces for the store. It was a marvelous experience.”

To this day, reading and art (especially painting) are what June does most in her spare time. “I can literally sit down in the morning, have the radio on in the background, and spend the rest of the day doing that. It’s very relaxing; it’s like therapy. It’s wonderful.”

Discovering new interests
June even found that by stepping out of her comfort zone, she wound up discovering one of her favorite hobbies—golf!

After a close friend encouraged her to take lessons, June was invited to join a women’s golf club.

“It’s a wonderful way to meet people. You enjoy the fresh air, and you can play it on your own or with others!”

Besides golfing and painting, June likes to listen to music and enjoys all of the musical guests who entertain at Touchmark.

“We just had a group in the other night that I just loved! I love the music of the ’50s and ’60s— Patsy Cline, Bing Crosby, and even some of the rock music that’s out there today.”

June has also been busy making new bridge friends within Touchmark, who meet twice a week to play cards. “More people should play bridge, because it really makes you think. You have to know where the cards are, and I like that it keeps your mind alert.”

Keeping busy is a priority for June. “I knit scarves and other little things while I’m watching TV; it’s a wonderful pastime.”

Settling into her new home
“Now that I’m here, I feel like I have the best of both worlds. I still like to cook, but I can go for meals if I want. My home is always clean, and between the office staff, medical staff, and cleaning staff, you’re just treated so well no matter who you are.”

With June’s personal motto being “you’re only as old as you feel,” she has been taking full advantage of the daily fitness classes Touchmark offers. “We do light aerobics, Pilates, stretching. For me, the program is just right.”

June is thankful the community offers the opportunity to “give back,” too.

“I’ve been able to volunteer in the Health Services Neighborhood here a few times now, helping to push some of the residents in wheelchairs around the community or on outings. It’s the little things they seem to enjoy, and I do, as well. I look forward to volunteering more of my time there.”

The best thing about living at Touchmark?

“No more worries,” exclaims June. “No more worrying about random things like caring for a home. This is the ultimate. You get a bit of everything all in one place. I feel so blessed.”

Catch them if you can

What’s the next adventure when you’ve already traveled to all seven continents, all 50 states, and have been to all Canadian provinces? Ask Fran and Ralph Brown!

The active couple moved to Bend, Oregon six years ago from the San Francisco area after visiting longtime friends and walking the River Trail. Ralph explains, “As we saw Touchmark, we asked, ‘What is that?’” After a tour on Saturday, they returned Sunday with friends and found their home.

Next month marks their 50th wedding anniversary. Ralph was stationed in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and Fran was there on vacation. Ralph struck up a conversation with Fran (or vice versa!) at a swimming pool, and they went out for two-and-a-half weeks. Fran returned to Toronto, Canada; they reconnected in the San Francisco area at Christmas, got engaged, then Ralph departed for a nine-month deployment to the Far East.

On his return, they were married at Treasure Island in San Francisco and honeymooned on the Big Island of Hawaii.

Career in the service
Ralph grew up in San Francisco, served in the Navy for 30 years, and spent 12 years as a financial planner assisting military clients. He held a part-time job in Tiburon, California, at a small company managing a warehouse and driving a forklift. “I enjoyed that,” says Ralph. “Here at Touchmark, I have enjoyed being on the Resident Council and focusing on the buildings and grounds and providing input to management on behalf of the residents.”

Born in Toronto, Canada, Fran was a physical education and swim instructor. She went back to school to get a master’s degree in Clinical Psychology. “I taught Jazz Aerobic Calisthenics classes in Key West, New York, and other areas for Navy wives even before Jazzercise® became popular.” In addition to her fitness activities, Fran now enjoys attending Bible study groups, hiking, scrapbooking, and participating
in community projects.

World travelers
As osprey and eagles soar outside their window, they share favorite places they’ve traveled. “I’ve been to Africa three times, and I love the animals and wildlife habitat,” says Fran. Ralph says he prefers Chile and Antarctica. “They’re beautiful, quiet places with lots of good adventures.”

Ralph adds they really enjoy sharing their travel experiences with the Touchmark community. “For our most recent presentation on Namibia, over 100 people showed up.”

So, what’s next for Ralph and Fran? Off to Iceland and Greenland next summer, which will be their 13th trip overseas, and they always love visiting their grandkids in Spokane and San Diego.

“We love Touchmark! With all of our travel, we really appreciate how we can up-and-go and not worry about security,” says Fran. “The staff are lively, fun, and interactive, from the front desk to housekeeping to maintenance.” Ralph adds, “They are responsive, engaging, friendly, and they always know your name. Last year Fran was diagnosed with breast cancer. “Throughout the entire experience, I was so thankful for the incredible support when coming home to Touchmark.”

Both enjoy meeting new people at social hours in the lodges and sharing meals with friends in the dining room. “The food is very good,” says Fran. “They give a balanced portion, their salad bar is very fresh, and you should really try the tasty salmon.”

Ralph likes attending Current Events on Thursdays, when a group gathers to discuss the past week of events and what’s going on in the world. “There’s so much to do at Touchmark whether it’s concerts, Scottish dancers, playing Jeopardy every Friday to challenge our brain, playing bocce ball outside, or walking on the beautiful River Trail right outside our front door.”

“We also enjoy the various health lectures, like the one recently on how music has such an impact on memory,” says Fran.

Whether traveling or engaging in Touchmark’s many Life Enrichment/Wellness offerings, the Browns savor their very full, active life!

Meet Edwin Ternes

Enjoying freedom and good days

c32a2819Life has been good for Edwin Ternes since making Touchmark his home in December 2014. “Every day is a good day here,” he says.

For most of his life, Edwin farmed the land originally homesteaded by his grandfather. After his wife passed away in 2000, Edwin found that his days were spent working the farm and watching television. His sons felt he would benefit from being more social, and in fall 2014, they approached him with an idea.

“They asked me if I would try Touchmark, and they offered to pay for one month’s rent.” That December, Edwin moved to Touchmark for a short-term stay. He loved the lifestyle and his active social life at Touchmark! He wasn’t sure, though, if he had the financial means to move permanently. But he was in for a surprise. “I had long-term care insurance. I didn’t know whether it would cover me, but it did!”

A social butterfly

The abundance of social opportunities has been a welcome change from Edwin’s solitary life on the farm. He visits with neighbors while having breakfast and supper in the dining room and keeps himself busy with card games and community-planned activities throughout the day. “I don’t spend a lot of time in my home other than when I’m sleeping,” he says.

“If I want to be alone here, I can, but I like how I just walk out of my door, and I can be with people and do things I like to do. I used to watch way more TV than I do now, because that was my only entertainment. Now I have things I enjoy more.”

Edwin has been impressed with the Touchmark team members and his new neighbors and friends.

“The people who work here are like one big happy family who work together to take care of the residents. You can tell they want to be here. There are a lot of different activities they do for us, and they take us to a lot of different places on the bus.”

Edwin says the residents are like family. “We play a lot of cards; there’s always someone around to play with.” When he’s not playing cards with his neighbors, Edwin can be found participating in the many community events. “I like the beanbag toss; there’s Wii bowling; we have social hours with a few drinks; and sometimes there’s music. I’m not great with dancing, but I do a little of that, too.” Whatever the activity, Edwin is always game when it comes to getting in on the action, whether he’s a pro or a novice.

A little help when needed

Edwin has welcomed the reduced stress that comes with living at Touchmark. “There were a lot of hard things I had to do on the farm. I spent many years sitting on the tractor when it was windy and 30 below. But when you live through hard times, you appreciate when things get better. Now, they do my laundry here. Once a week they clean my apartment. They help with putting my socks on and doing different things that are hard for me to do … You aren’t going to hear any complaints from me!”

When living alone, Edwin ate a diet of convenience rather than sound nutrition. Now he doesn’t have to worry about shopping or cooking as he enjoys nutritious chef-prepared meals twice daily. “I am eating healthier than I was living by myself.”

A very good year

“I’ve said to quite a few people that this was one of my better years in my life,” he says. “When you live on a farm, there are always a lot of worries about making it work. Now I’m free from all that.”

The new lifestyle, reduced stress, and nutritious diet have positively affected Edwin’s well-being. “This past year, I’ve had no health problems, and I didn’t have to work! What more can anybody ask for?”