Staying physically active for greater independence

As we age, it’s essential that we stay active. Exercise does more than keep our hearts healthy—it benefits our bones, our muscles, and our minds! By staying physically active, we’re more likely to be able to stay independent as we age.

At Touchmark, our full-service Health & Fitness Clubs and Studios provide everything you need to stay healthy every day, in a fun and supportive environment.

Enjoy a full life of fun and fitness

Our full-service Clubs are open to both Touchmark residents and the public—for individuals 50 or older. The Clubs include indoor heated pools, warm-water spas with whirlpool jets and seating for eight, group exercise studios, NeuroCom® Balance Master®s, various types and styles of cardio equipment, personal trainers and professionally trained staff, and many other amenities.

Designed exclusively for those 50+, we offer a wide range of specialized classes (such as Zumba, Functional Fitness, and Balance & Stability) and specialized equipment that can positively affect conditions such as arthritis, cancer, heart disease, stroke, osteoporosis, diabetes, hypertension, and depression. Members of the Clubs and Studios are welcome to train for their general health and wellness or work toward more specific goals.

All programs are tailored to individual levels of ability, skill, and personal fitness goals and are designed to help you improve and maintain strength, flexibility, balance, coordination, and cardiovascular fitness, as well as supporting emotional health, and mental acuity, for maximum independence today and beyond.

The right level of care

Touchmark offers a wide range of care and lifestyle options to meet current health needs and to help plan for the future—allowing residents the ability to age in place and eliminate future moves.

Lifestyle options for residents of Touchmark range from Independent Living—which offers maintenance-free living and full community amenities—to Assisted Living and Memory Care for those requiring more care and assistance in everyday activities. Retirement counselors can help determine the most appropriate level of care for you or your loved one.

Touchmark team members in our memory care neighborhoods provide person-centered care through the Best Friends™ approach. This industry-leading method of care focuses on building meaningful relationships with those living with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia. Memory care homes are intentionally designed to provide a secure, comforting, and supportive home environment.

For those recovering from an accident, illness, or surgery, some Touchmark communities also offer Home Health services for medical care and Home Care services for personal care.

Experience active-adult retirement living at Touchmark …

At Touchmark, we truly believe that a full life is available to anyone—no matter one’s age. We live this belief by ensuring residents have the unique tools, opportunities, and community support necessary to bring their personal visions to life.

Our Full Life Wellness & Life Enrichment Program™ has won national and international awards for the unique way it helps people enrich their daily lives, encouraging each of us to take control of our own health and happiness. It does this by focusing on key areas of enrichment, including health and fitness, lifelong learning, volunteerism, creative arts, and spiritual well-being. Residents and team members at each community create an exciting calendar of classes, events, excursions, and activities, such as the Touchmark Trekkers walking program, the Knifty Knitters, CardioFit, and the Brain Builders group, and many, many more.

Each of these areas of enrichment falls under a tier of our seven dimensions of wellness, and our Health & Fitness Clubs and Studios are just one of the ways we help enrich residents’ lives every single day.

Take heart!

February is Heart Month, and as we approach the end of the month, this is a great time to take one more look at what you’re doing to make your heart the healthiest this year that it can be.

Below, Touchmark Director of Health & Fitness Operations Kim Lehmann lists the steps people can take each day to improve their heart. “Many of these habits we’ve heard before, but a few may surprise you.”

Healthy habits for the heart:

Food: Eat an abundance of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and good-for-you fats and protein. Limit the amount of red meat, salt, and potassium. Maintain a healthy weight.

Fitness: Exercise daily—cardio, strength, flexibility, and balance. Stand more; sit less.

Sleep: Strive for 7–8 hours each night. If you have sleep apnea, treat it.

Stress: Practice ways to reduce daily stress, such as meditating, devoting time to a hobby, etc.

Teeth: Brush and floss your teeth; the health of your mouth affects the health of your heart.

Alcohol: Avoid excessive alcohol consumption. The recommendation is one drink a day for women, two for men.

Socialization: Spend time with friends. Laugh.

Depression: Get medical help and treat depression.

Smoking: Don’t smoke. If you do, seek help to break the habit.

Take care of yourself: Visit your doctor. Take prescribed medications. Be aware women are at increased heart disease risk after menopause. Men taking the “blue pill” for erectile dysfunction are also especially at heart risk for heart disease.

Kim says with an increasing number of people taking pills that affect the heart rate, it’s important to not rely on general pulse targets when exercising. “If people are taking one of these medications, they want to work with a professional to determine what’s ideal for them so they don’t overtax the heart.”

Similarly, she says high temperatures can be problematic. “There’s a reason saunas and warm-water spas post warnings and caution people to limit their time. The increased temperature opens blood vessels, and people can become dizzy or faint if they’re exposed too long to the high temperatures.”

Along with being the number-one cause of death, heart disease is one of the leading causes of disability. “As we age, the walls of our heart thicken and stiffen. This can lead to inefficient pumping, which can bring on high blood pressure, increased fatigue, and exercise intolerance. By following healthy habits, we can minimize the effects aging has on the heart and enjoy each day to the fullest.”

For more information, visit: niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-topics/weight-control/young-heart-tips-Older-adults/Documents/YAH_TipSheet.pdf

 

Nurture your social wellness this spring!

Regardless of what the weather forecast says for this month, spring is on its way! This season of growth is a great time to reconnect with friends and cultivate social wellness after a long and cold winter inside.

Socialization and friendships provide significant benefits to our overall health and wellness including enhancing mental health and self-esteem, providing a sense of belonging and purpose, and holding us accountable when our schedule becomes a little less structured.

Making new friends is not always as easy as it sounds, but there are opportunities abound for nearly everyone these days—especially in today’s connected world.

  • Take advantage of community events. Retirement communities provide many classes, performances, and outings at little to no cost, often with transportation included.
  • Get online. If distance or transportation is an issue, connect with friends via FaceTime, Skype, Facebook, or other digital mediums.
  • Volunteer your time. Giving back stimulates many different aspects of personal wellness, and helps to support great causes, as well!
  • Share your interests and expertise. If you can’t find something to join, consider teaching a class or starting a club of your own, which will likely draw in those with similar interests. As you’re getting out and participating in different events, consider those who may be feeling isolated and extend an invitation! A kind gesture goes far and will likely be reciprocated in the future to further cultivate your own social wellness.

Cultivating a JOY{FULL} holiday season

The end of the year is a time of togetherness and reflection. As we spend time with family and friends, we often think back on what the year has brought us, and what we have to look forward to in the new year.

But with age, the holidays can sometimes trigger feelings of sadness and anger as we think about those no longer with us or health conditions that keep us from celebrating the same way we did in years past.

No matter your situation, there are ways for everyone to celebrate the season and get in the holiday spirit:

  • Share stories and look through old photo albums. Telling younger generations about your past experiences can help bring families closer together and honor those who have passed.
  • Be reasonable with your schedule. Don’t agree to attend too much if you think it will tire you. Conversely, if you’re feeling like you don’t have much planned for the holidays, consider volunteering to give back and surround yourself with like-minded people.
  • Stick to your routines. With a lot going on, it’s easy to slip up on certain habits, but following your regular exercise program and eating healthfully (in moderation!) can help you continue to feel your best.

Keep in mind that the best way to spend the holidays is doing what feels right for you. Enjoy the season!

Embracing the great outdoors

Summer is in full swing! With sunshine and warmer weather, it’s a great time to get outside and enjoy the outdoors.

Spending time outside provides a number of physical and mental benefits to people of all ages. Just a half hour each day can enhance wellness and state of mind. Benefits include:

  • Increased vitamin D levels—especially important for seniors
  • Enhanced attention levels by taking a break from everyday overstimulation
  • More restful sleep as a result of less time spent in artificial light
  • Strengthened immunity in the form of increased white blood cells

To take advantage of the beautiful weather and cultivate your physical wellness, consider taking some of your exercise routines outside. While strenuous exercise in high temperatures is not recommended for older adults, there are plenty of options to get you moving.

  • Take a walk through your neighborhood or on a trail.
  • Hit the pool. Cool off while getting exercise!
  • Bring your normal workout outside. Take your weights or yoga mat to your backyard and let the sounds of nature serve as a soundtrack to your routine.
  • Work in the garden. Beautify your yard, harvest a bounty, and get a workout while doing so!
  • Play around with grandchildren. A simple game of baseball or tag is a great way to connect with loved ones and get some physical activity.
  • If physical mobility is limited, even enjoying a meal or a conversation outside can provide great health and wellness benefits.

Choose an activity that interests you and take advantage of the power of nature!

Sleep Habits: What’s normal and what’s not?

Older adults need the same amount of sleep as adults of any age (seven to nine hours per night), but certain factors and conditions can make restful sleep difficult to achieve, leaving seniors feeling fatigued and often affecting their health. Poor sleep habits can also lead to depression, attention and memory issues, increased risk of falls, and moodiness.

With age, we naturally produce less melatonin, the hormone that promotes sleep. Our bodies also tend to shift our schedule, waking us earlier in the morning and making us tired earlier in the evening. While some changes in sleep habits are considered normal with age, significantly disturbed sleep is not part of normal aging and should be shared with your doctor.

Among adults over 60, insomnia is the most common sleep problem. Insomnia can involve trouble falling asleep and staying asleep, and can last for years.

Certain conditions can also contribute to sleep changes. Those living with Alzheimer’s disease are also prone to changes in sleeping habits, which might include sleeping too much, not enough, or wandering or yelling at night. Chronic pain can make sleep uncomfortable, sleep apnea can cause people to wake multiple times without realizing it, and movement disorders such as restless leg syndrome can make it hard to get a good night’s sleep.

Fortunately, there are some ways to develop healthy sleep habits. To promote deep, restful sleep, try the following:

  • Avoid naps in the late afternoon or evening, which could keep you awake at night.
  • Develop a bedtime routine to help your mind and body know it’s time to unwind and prepare for sleep. This might include reading a book, taking a bath, or listening to music.
  • Avoid bright screens in the bedroom—the light from these devices can make it difficult to fall asleep.
  • Be mindful of food and drink. Caffeine, alcohol, and large meals can have an effect on sleep, especially when consumed later in the day.
  • Get regular exercise, but not within three hours of bedtime.

If sleep problems persist, talk to your doctor to help pinpoint the individual cause of your sleep issues.

Essential estate planning documents

Although it may be difficult to think about, having an estate plan in place ensures that you and your assets are cared for by someone you trust when you are no longer able to do so yourself. No matter your health or your age, it’s never too early to begin arranging your end-of-life plan and to share your wishes with those you trust.

The first step in planning your estate is speaking to a lawyer who is knowledgeable on state laws and required documents, and can answer any questions you may have.

A typical estate plan includes instructions for how your health care, assets, and funeral should be handled as well as who has the authority to make these different decisions. Several different legal documents should be in place to make up a comprehensive estate plan.

The most important documents for every estate plan include:

  • Power of attorney for health care: This document designates another individual to make health care decisions on your behalf should you become unable to do so. A backup individual can also be selected.
  • Living will: Also known as an advanced health care directive, this document specifies your wishes for end-of-life care or in the case of a catastrophic illness. Discussing these wishes with your designated health care power of attorney can help make a difficult time easier.
  • Durable power of attorney: This enables you to choose who will handle your finances as well as how you would like them to be handled. Without a power of attorney, a court may be left to determine the distribution of your assets.
  • Authorization for final disposition: While “next of kin” is legally authorized to make funeral and burial arrangements, this document lets you specify a different individual if desired and also detail how you wish your funeral and burial to be handled.
  • Trusts and wills: These documents instruct what should be done with your assets (money, possessions, real estate, etc.) upon death, and who will be in charge of carrying out your wishes.
  • Inventory of assets: This document contains all of the vital information necessary for someone to manage your estate, including bank information, credit card numbers, attorney contacts, pensions, insurance, and more.

Once these documents are in place, it’s important to review them regularly and make sure they are in line with your current needs and wishes. Discuss the plan with those involved and be sure to store the documents in a safe, accessible place.

When “fine” is not really fine

As the child of an aging parent, it can be difficult to notice signs that things may not be as “fine” as the parent claims them to be. Those who live far away and may be consumed with their own busy lives can easily miss changes that can affect their parent’s safety, health, and overall well-being.

When visiting a parent or loved one, the signs listed below are just some of the things to keep an eye on to make sure they are continuing to manage well at home. Spending the night at a person’s house can often provide more insights than a short visit, and can allow you to observe hygiene, cleaning, and nutrition habits.

  • If things are piling up, the lawn and garden are overgrown, and laundry is not done, household chores may be too much to handle.
  • In the kitchen, charred pots and pans or burn marks on the countertops can indicate potential safety concerns. Expired food in the refrigerator may mean that nutrition needs are not being met.
  • Scratches on the side of the car could indicate it’s time to give up the keys.
  • Even when living with a spouse, the partner who serves as caregiver may be overwhelmed and in need of support.

A parent or loved one who insists they are managing fine by themselves will likely be resistant to accepting help. They may be too proud, in denial, or trying to avoid feeling like a burden. It’s important to approach any conversation with sensitivity and not just force a solution upon the person.

Adjustments to help a loved one manage at home can be small and may not require much disruption to personal routines. Hiring a cleaning service, transportation, or home care to assist with daily activities can help an older adult maintain their confidence and remain independent in their home.

Agreeing to check in every few months can help to identify potential issues and find solutions before they get serious. Maintaining an open dialogue about the changes that lie ahead can help to avoid surprises and avoid children having to “parent” their older parents.

How much exercise do I actually need?

Senior couple riding bikes

No matter your age, physical activity is essential to maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle. It can help reduce the risk of certain health conditions, keep muscles strong, and help you maintain your independence for longer.

Any activity is better than nothing, but the CDC recommends achieving certain levels of activity to gain maximum benefits from exercise.

For those over the age of 65 with no limiting health conditions, it is recommended to get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week, plus two or more days of muscle-strengthening activities that target all major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms).

What kind of exercise should I focus on?

While 150 minutes per week can sound like a lot, it’s much more manageable when broken down into smaller increments. You might spend 30 minutes exercising five days out of the week—or you might break that down further into 10-minute segments.

Aerobic activity should be done for at least 10 minutes at a time to get the heart beating faster. These activities can range in intensity from mild to vigorous and it’s important to note that one minute of vigorous activity is roughly the same as two minutes of moderate activity. Aerobic activities can include:

  • Brisk walking
  • Mowing the lawn
  • Taking a dance class
  • Riding a bike

Muscle-strengthening activities help keep muscles strong and should be done as repetitions (8-12) in a set. You can strengthen your muscles through:

  • Lifting weights
  • Using resistance bands
  • Heavy gardening
  • Yoga
  • Doing push-ups, sit-ups, and other exercises that use body weight as resistance

Exercise is for everyone

Many people also believe the misconception that if they are living with a chronic condition or disability, physical activity may not be safe for them. In fact, physical activity provides important health benefits for everyone, as it can improve quality of life and help reduce the risk of developing certain conditions. Inactivity can be more dangerous than activity for your overall health.

It’s recommended to speak with your doctor to determine the best types and amounts of exercise for you.

Finding focus in an increasingly distracting world

attraktive, grauhaarige Frau genießt das MeerThese days, just reading an article online can seem like an impossible task—with pop-up ads, related links, email notifications, and more competing for our attention as we read. Even offline, cell phones, television and radio ads, or a knock at the door make distractions feel more ubiquitous than ever.

 

Organizations, advertisers, and even our loved ones are constantly trying to compete for our attention. This endless stimulation can have negative effects on our ability to focus on one task. Research shows that after a distraction, it takes an average of 25 minutes to get back to the original task.

 

As we age, not only do we have to contend against the endless distractions of the modern world, but we also are battling nature’s effects on the brain, with an increase in memory problems and brain fog. Getting through a to-do list can seem almost impossible.

 

Fortunately, there are steps to help restore or enhance focus and feel confident in your productivity.

 

  • Keep a notepad and pen nearby to jot down any reminders that you think of in the middle of a task—avoiding having to interrupt yourself with something new. While multi-tasking is a common goal, the brain can really only handle two simultaneous thoughts.

 

  • Practice mindful meditation to train your brain to stay clear throughout your day. This can be as simple as taking a few seconds to count your breaths.

 

  • Schedule time for important tasks and commit to completing them (and nothing else) during that time.

 

  • Train your focusing abilities on something you enjoy. Read a book or watch a movie to enhance engagement and absorb yourself in the story. These skills can be recalled when working toward a goal.

 

  • Exercise your mind every day. Crossword puzzles, passionate discussions, or making something keeps your mind active and strong.

 

Focus may not be attainable in ways it once was, but with mindful behavior it can still be achievable for maintaining a productive way of life.