Debunking Detoxes and Cleanses

It’s summer and numerous messages we receive from the fitness, nutrition, and wellness industries have conflicting information. In particular, topics like detoxification, cleanses, hydration, and sports drinks can be confusing.

Detoxing and cleanses

A variety of detoxification (“detox”) diets and regimens, often referred to as “cleanses” or “flushes,” are suggested as a means of removing toxins from the body or losing weight.

Detox programs may involve a variety of approaches, such as:

  • Fasting
  • Consuming only juices or other liquids for several days
  • Eating a very restricted selection of foods
  • Using various dietary supplements or other commercial products
  • Emptying the colon with enemas, laxatives, or colon hydrotherapy (aka “colonic irrigation”)

At this time, there is no convincing evidence that detox or cleansing programs actually remove toxins from your body or improve your health. In most cases for healthy individuals, the body’s remarkable intrinsic detoxification system—the liver, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and colon—work in conjunction with each other to remove harmful substances without needing any outside help.

The weight loss element of a detox diet typically results in a reduction in the intake of calories versus the “detox” itself.

From a health and safety perspective, use caution, as some of the products and procedures used in detox/cleansing programs may be harmful to your health. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and Federal Trade Commission have taken action against several companies selling detox/cleansing products because they contained illegal or potentially harmful ingredients. If you do decide to try a detoxification or cleansing product, be sure to clear it with your physician beforehand.