Still working—and living at Touchmark

Eric Ericson, 80, still gets up and leaves for work at 6 am every weekday morning and commutes to St. Anthony Hospital, where he has worked for two decades and serves as Director of Accounting.

“I love what I do, and they love what I do for them. I will continue working as long as I am in good health. I don’t have a hobby, so if I were to retire, I really wouldn’t have anything to do. I’m not an idle type of person. I need to be busy.”
Eric and his wife Sharon recently moved into their single-family Parkview home. Sharon, 73, retired about five years ago from Francis Tuttle Technology Center, where she taught Medical Office Technology.

She laughs and says they were ready to move “because Eric was tired of making sure the yard was taken care of, the pool, that sort of thing.” Actually, both say they were ready to downsize from their Oklahoma City home of more than 4,000 square feet to their new home, which is just under 2,000.
Once they made the decision to move, the couple went comparison-shopping throughout the Oklahoma City metropolitan area, sizing up different retirement communities.

“Parkview came out on top for a lot of reasons.”
Eric says there were three reasons they chose Touchmark. “One is the staff was just absolutely supportive, informative, and friendly. The way they treated us was just exceptional.”
Economically, the move was a sound financial decision, he adds. Another appealing aspect was how the Parkview neighborhood looks. “It really feels like it’s part of the larger Coffee Creek housing addition,” says Eric. “The appearance makes it look like you are just in a normal neighborhood.” They both enjoy the close proximity to the larger Touchmark community where they can dine and participate in social activities.

Neighbors welcomed Sharon and Eric to Parkview long before they moved into their home. “The neighbors just across the street came over and introduced themselves,” smiles Sharon. “Then we met several while we were eating at Touchmark as guests, so we knew the names of several neighbors. The whole concept is incredible.” Eric agrees. “We love the neighbors we’ve already met. They’re very friendly.”

They are active members of the River of Life Church where Sharon plays the piano and keyboard, and Eric sings on the worship team.

In remaining on the job long past age 65, Eric says he’s following the lead of his late father, who also moved into a retirement community before he retired. “My goal is to easily live to 100. I may not work until then, but who knows. If things are going well, and I’m in good health, why not work until 90!”

Meet Juanita Ryan

Savoring good food, books, and friends
dsc_8868Since moving to Touchmark in 2013, Juanita Ryan has fully embraced the Touchmark lifestyle. Her days are filled with meaningful pursuits, healthy living, and enriching relationships—interests nurtured over decades.

Raised on a farm in Milroy, Minnesota, Juanita helped her mother with household chores while her father tended the crops of grain. “But I always wanted to be a nurse, ever since I was a little girl,” she says. This desire was fueled after discovering the Sue Barton series of books. The main character, Sue Barton, was to aspiring nurses what Nancy Drew was to budding detectives. “I loved that series of books.”

While attending Augsburg College in Minneapolis, Juanita met her husband Bob. Even though she moved on to Deaconess Nursing School, the couple kept in touch. After just a few months following their graduation and marriage in 1952, Bob was drafted to serve in the Korean War. “While he served overseas, I started my nursing career.”

Upon his return two years later, the Ryans started a family. Juanita continued working as a nurse part time while raising their son and two daughters. “I especially loved working in home health and adult daycare. It was so fantastic and rewarding to help families.” She retired in 1992 after 40 years of serving patients and their families. Her love of nursing rubbed off on both of her daughters. Today, both work in nursing.

Montana moves
Seeking a drier climate, the Ryans moved to Seeley Lake, Montana. “Bob was a pilot, and we loved traveling around in our small planes, including one he built.” In 2000, they moved to Helena to be closer to medical care.

“One day, we called and talked with Touchmark—we had talked with them before. We learned there was a cottage available. Within the month, we had moved. Our kids were tickled to death we were living at Touchmark.”

Less than a year after moving, Bob’s declining health led to a move into Touchmark’s assisted living neighborhood. “It was so wonderful that when something like that happened, we could move right to assisted living. My husband and I had been married 61 years when he died. We had a good life.”

Today, Juanita enjoys her third-floor apartment. “I have a lovely view of the hills to the southwest. I have a lot of friends, and everything is good. And when you’d like to talk with someone, you can just go have a cup of coffee at the coffee shop, and talk and visit.”

Tasting the Full Life
For the past year, Juanita has served on the Resident Council as food liaison. Residents come to her with any issues, specific dietary requirements, or comments about the food. Serving in this role has made Juanita even more conscious of what she eats. “I have never eaten so many vegetables as I have since I came here!”

Juanita appreciates how responsive Chef Chris Bullard is to residents’ suggestions. “I talk with Chris at least once a week. He’s very good. He listens. For example, everyone was so tickled when we got the salad bar. And for those who don’t like standing in line, we’ve made it clear that all they have to do is ask a server, who will get them cottage cheese and fruit or a salad. Our servers are really good, and it works well.”

In addition to the taste and quality of the food, presentation is important. “Last night was so exceptional,” she enthuses. “I had to go tell him that right away!” Juanita is friends with the previous food liaison and says the two always eat at the same table. “We talk continuously about food!”

In addition to serving Touchmark residents through her role on the Resident Council, Juanita also facilitates the Touchmark book club. “I read with talking books. I can sew and read at the same time!”

Other pursuits include going on outings, visiting with friends, and participating in Gentle Yoga classes. “The yoga class is so good for people like me who need to keep limber!” Church activities also remain a large part of Juanita’s life, and she appreciates the transportation to appointments. And whenever she’s at home, she loves to cuddle up with her 12-year-old cat, Blackie.

“I’m very content, and I’m not moving anymore!”

Sleep Habits: What’s normal and what’s not?

Older adults need the same amount of sleep as adults of any age (seven to nine hours per night), but certain factors and conditions can make restful sleep difficult to achieve, leaving seniors feeling fatigued and often affecting their health. Poor sleep habits can also lead to depression, attention and memory issues, increased risk of falls, and moodiness.

With age, we naturally produce less melatonin, the hormone that promotes sleep. Our bodies also tend to shift our schedule, waking us earlier in the morning and making us tired earlier in the evening. While some changes in sleep habits are considered normal with age, significantly disturbed sleep is not part of normal aging and should be shared with your doctor.

Among adults over 60, insomnia is the most common sleep problem. Insomnia can involve trouble falling asleep and staying asleep, and can last for years.

Certain conditions can also contribute to sleep changes. Those living with Alzheimer’s disease are also prone to changes in sleeping habits, which might include sleeping too much, not enough, or wandering or yelling at night. Chronic pain can make sleep uncomfortable, sleep apnea can cause people to wake multiple times without realizing it, and movement disorders such as restless leg syndrome can make it hard to get a good night’s sleep.

Fortunately, there are some ways to develop healthy sleep habits. To promote deep, restful sleep, try the following:

  • Avoid naps in the late afternoon or evening, which could keep you awake at night.
  • Develop a bedtime routine to help your mind and body know it’s time to unwind and prepare for sleep. This might include reading a book, taking a bath, or listening to music.
  • Avoid bright screens in the bedroom—the light from these devices can make it difficult to fall asleep.
  • Be mindful of food and drink. Caffeine, alcohol, and large meals can have an effect on sleep, especially when consumed later in the day.
  • Get regular exercise, but not within three hours of bedtime.

If sleep problems persist, talk to your doctor to help pinpoint the individual cause of your sleep issues.

Becoming Mindful of Wastefulness

This article is the first in a three-part series from professional organizer Vicki Norris on getting organized to help save money. Look for part two next month, and more posts from Vicki coming soon!

Do you find yourself tossing rotten food due to poor meal planning? Have you paid more in late fees or premiums, because you couldn’t face the mountain of paperwork?

 If so, you have a hole in your pocket! We all think about saving money; however, if we focus solely on spending less, we miss a big opportunity to save by trimming wastefulness.

In almost two decades as a professional organizer, I have been waist-deep in people’s belongings and “overage”. They have overspent, overaccumulated, overstashed, and overdone it! While they likely know they have spent too much or procrastinated one-too-many-times, they may not realize their haphazard habits are siphoning their money!

The opportunity to save is in our home and habits, and together, we are digging out. Expand your focus from simply watching pennies to trimming wastefulness. When you get organized, you will be amazed how much money you will save.

This month, note areas of waste in your home and life and take action to scale those back. Next month, I’ll reveal how to create household order to recover funds. In the third post, I’ll share simple financial systems to end wastefulness. Here’s to an ordered year of good stewardship!

Vicki Norris, president of Restoring Order®, is a nationally recognized organizing expert, author, and speaker. Her team of professional organizers serves home and business clients in Washington and Oregon. You can watch her organizing segments on KPTV’s Fox 12 More Good Day Oregon. Visit RestoringOrder.com for more information.

Enhance wellness through lifelong learning

DHB_3903You’re never too old to learn something new. These days, learning a new skill and keeping the brain active has never been easier for older adults. A study by the Rush Memory and Aging Project showed that seniors who are cognitively active were less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia than those who did not exercise their brains.

In addition to stimulating the brain and helping to enhance intellectual wellness, these pursuits are often social endeavors that can provide as sense of involvement and belonging in the community as well as helping to avoid feelings of isolation.

There are many excuses that might keep someone from learning something new: it’s not worth the effort, it’s too expensive, I’d have no way of getting there, among others. But educational opportunities are more abundant than you might realize, both in your community and in the digital world.

  • Libraries, senior centers, and local retirement communities likely offer courses or seminars—and often at no charge. These offerings may be held in partnership with local colleges and provide a more convenient way to access an in-depth look at a favorite or new subject.
  • Local colleges and universities may offer the opportunity for waived tuition or scholarships for older adults pursuing either credit or non-credit courses.
  • Auditing a course provides the social and intellectual benefits without the stress of exams, homework, and high costs.
  • Online courses are convenient for getting access to information without having to leave your home. And they can still provide the social benefits of an in-person class through online discussions.

Growing our minds and learning something new doesn’t have to end with retirement. Find what interests you and pursue greater knowledge!

Resident Feature: Love and life—before and after dementia

When Alice Kulak married Geoff, her high school sweetheart, 57 years ago, she knew life would be anything but boring.

Alice, 78, kept an active schedule volunteering with the Junior League of Edmonton, serving on the board of directors of the Art Gallery of Alberta, and sitting on the executive board of the Chamber Music Society. She worked part-time and anchored the home front for her husband and two daughters, but Geoff, now 79, led the parade!

Geoff was a prominent, well-regarded engineer with an international reputation for his specialty in steel structures.

“It was an adventure,” remembers Alice. “He was ambitious and bright, and we lived for periods of time in places as diverse as the US, Brazil, South Africa, Switzerland, and Norway where Geoff lectured and did research.”

Geoff taught for 25 years in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Alberta, retiring in 1994. He sat on many technical committees in Canada and the US. In 1996, he cochaired with lawyer Ken McKenzie the Royal Commission that investigated the rollercoaster accident at West Edmonton Mall that resulted in three deaths.

Geoff wrote the engineering textbook Limit States Design in Structural Steel, which is still used at the undergraduate level in 95% of Canadian universities. To honor him, the Steel Fabricators of Alberta created a $30,000 annual scholarship fund in his name.

Dealing with “the diagnosis”

Over four years ago, Geoff was diagnosed as having entry-level dementia. The couple’s once fast-paced and busy lifestyle shifted to more of a shuffle. The change has affected both Alice and Geoff equally.

“There’s a lot of pain and grief as you see a life slipping away; seeing your loved one losing his presence. Geoff feels frustrated as well. He realizes he is losing ground, and it bewilders him.”

The Kulaks moved to Touchmark as the couple realized the two-story home they were living in had become more house and garden than they could handle. Alice, Geoff, and their two daughters felt it was the right time to make the move as Geoff’s dementia was becoming more defined.

“We definitely enjoy the maintenance-free lifestyle here at Touchmark. When we need someone to fix something, it happens very quickly.” Touchmark’s various levels of care services also appealed to the couple.

“Everything has changed in the last two-and-a-half years. I now feel the responsibility of being a caregiver rather than a companion. I take care of Geoff and the household, but I now also handle all of the things Geoff used to deal with like our investments and taxes. All of this, while trying to grieve the husband I am losing.”

Helping hands

Two times a week for four hours, Alice has help through Home Care Services as well as from Touchmark’s assisted living staff to give her some time for herself.

“My goal now is to keep my health and my spirits up for Geoff. I exercise using the treadmill, bike, medicine ball, and weights for 35-45 minutes a day. The staff are great with Geoff, so during my breaks I go play bridge. I love going for lunch with my friends and going to church or reading.”

The respite care has been a benefit to the couple’s relationship, as well. “I’ve realized that I need time for myself. And Geoff welcomes the caregivers coming in. We’re together all of the time, so I’ve realized that he, too, wants relief from me.”

Memory care opening

With a new memory care neighborhood opened at Touchmark this March, more care options became available for families like the Kulaks.

“Geoff is on the waiting list, has had an interview with the nurses, and has been assessed for what his care needs would be. I know the quality of life for both of us would go up by having him there, but I still feel conflicted. I worry if I’ve done everything I can for him on my own,”

This is a conflict faced by many in the same situation. While it’s not an easy choice to make, Alice is comforted knowing there is quality memory care support coming available just a few doors away from her.

“Realizing I can’t do everything I want to do with him on my own and knowing that he could have quality care, and I could still be close by and involved—that gives me some peace of mind.”

Tips for other caregivers

While Alice realizes she isn’t alone in dealing with the demands of being a full-time caregiver, she also realizes just how fortunate she is to have help. She has friends who have gone through the same situation who have helped her, and now Alice shares her own personal story as a resource for others.

“My tips for other caregivers are these: get yourself into circumstances you can handle; get involved in your community; and ask for help! It’s important not to isolate yourself. Our family mantra is, ‘Keep Dad comfortable and loved,’ and having the help of my family and the extra care for Geoff have made my life—and his—a little easier.”

Essential estate planning documents

Although it may be difficult to think about, having an estate plan in place ensures that you and your assets are cared for by someone you trust when you are no longer able to do so yourself. No matter your health or your age, it’s never too early to begin arranging your end-of-life plan and to share your wishes with those you trust.

The first step in planning your estate is speaking to a lawyer who is knowledgeable on state laws and required documents, and can answer any questions you may have.

A typical estate plan includes instructions for how your health care, assets, and funeral should be handled as well as who has the authority to make these different decisions. Several different legal documents should be in place to make up a comprehensive estate plan.

The most important documents for every estate plan include:

  • Power of attorney for health care: This document designates another individual to make health care decisions on your behalf should you become unable to do so. A backup individual can also be selected.
  • Living will: Also known as an advanced health care directive, this document specifies your wishes for end-of-life care or in the case of a catastrophic illness. Discussing these wishes with your designated health care power of attorney can help make a difficult time easier.
  • Durable power of attorney: This enables you to choose who will handle your finances as well as how you would like them to be handled. Without a power of attorney, a court may be left to determine the distribution of your assets.
  • Authorization for final disposition: While “next of kin” is legally authorized to make funeral and burial arrangements, this document lets you specify a different individual if desired and also detail how you wish your funeral and burial to be handled.
  • Trusts and wills: These documents instruct what should be done with your assets (money, possessions, real estate, etc.) upon death, and who will be in charge of carrying out your wishes.
  • Inventory of assets: This document contains all of the vital information necessary for someone to manage your estate, including bank information, credit card numbers, attorney contacts, pensions, insurance, and more.

Once these documents are in place, it’s important to review them regularly and make sure they are in line with your current needs and wishes. Discuss the plan with those involved and be sure to store the documents in a safe, accessible place.

Spring cleaning versus organizing

This article is a guest post from professional organizer Vicki Norris.

Spring cleaning has arrived—or is it spring organizing? Cleaning de-grimes your living space producing disinfected surfaces, dirt-free floors, and sparkling sinks; however, cleaning can actually create clutter. In contrast, organizing asks you to stop, think, and make decisions about where items really belong.

Because decisions are involved, organizing takes a little longer than cleaning, but it’s worth it. By choosing not to simply hide clutter that you don’t want to deal with, you’re making smart choices to create and maintain order, which will prevent clutter from accumulating in the future. Organizing also prevents loss of items, which costs you enormous time, stress, and frustration.

Cleaning will produce a hygienic, unsoiled environment and temporary sense of relief. Engaging in the organizing process will produce sensible use of space and resources yielding more freedom and peace of mind.

The good news is that you can have both an organized and a clean home! When a space is organized, it is easier to clean, because nomadic items can be confidently returned to their appropriate location, and surfaces aren’t clogged with clutter.

I invite you to begin your own process of organizing; it is an investment in your quality of life!

Vicki Norris, president of Restoring Order®, is a nationally recognized organizing expert, author, and speaker. Her team of professional organizers serves home and business clients in Washington and Oregon. You can watch her organizing segments on KPTV’s Fox 12 More Good Day Oregon. Visit RestoringOrder.com for more information.

Resident Feature: Shari’s zest for life

May is Older Americans Month, and the minute you meet Shari (on left in photo), you realize she’s a woman full of life with boundless energy—someone who likes to make a difference in people’s lives. “I enjoy getting involved in a community and meeting people. I’ve done that everywhere I’ve lived,” says the Minneapolis Minnesota native who moved to Touchmark 13 months ago from her longtime home in Venice, Florida.

An outdoor enthusiast, Shari spends as much time working in her yard or walking as she can. She and her companion and best friend Lady, a 9-year-old papillion, are frequently seen playing Frisbee and going for walks. “My daughter found this cottage for me, and the corner lot is a blessing, I have a great yard, lots of open space, and great natural light coming in to my home. It has worked out perfectly.”

Community engagement

A former marketing manager for a chamber of commerce, Shari joined the Helena Chamber of Commerce right away. She takes every opportunity to attend the Chamber’s Lunch and Learn programs and other opportunities to learn more about Helena. She also joined the Elite Travel Group at a local bank and looks forward to their many local outings and educational lectures.

“I’m an avid supporter of the arts and purchased Helena Symphony season tickets,” she says, noting she also enjoys volunteering as an usher. In addition to joining a church, she has been taking a yearlong leadership course to keep herself engaged.

She is hoping to use her experience teaching English as a second language by volunteering with the Lewis and Clark Literacy Council. “I’ve reached out to several organizations to let them know I would be happy to help. I enjoy teaching and sharing my experiences with others.” Shari spent two summers teaching English to high school and first-year college teachers in China. “We primarily taught methodology. It was an amazing experience.”

Making her mark at Touchmark

With a skill for negotiation and a desire to improve her community, Shari accepted a position as the cottage representative on Touchmark’s Resident Council. She is also working with Touchmark staff to reduce how fast cars drive through the retirement community. “New 10 mph signs have been installed at the entrance, and we’re working on more ‘SLOW’ signs.”

Interest in mahjong is growing after Shari introduced the game. “We need two more full-time people to join us, and then we’ll have two strong teams.” In addition to mahjong, Shari participates in the Helena Duplicate Bridge Club as well as one at Touchmark.

Another of Shari’s keen interests is cooking and entertaining. She’s looking forward to hosting coffees and other social gatherings for her cottage neighbors. Last Christmas, she hosted a Tom & Jerry party for all the cottagers. “Super group and great fun!”

“Shari embraces all seven dimensions of wellness,” says Life Enrichment/Wellness Director Nanette Whitman-Holmes. “She demonstrates each day how older adults lead active, full lives.”

Read about more Touchmark residents and how they embody the {FULL} Life!

Positive Living with Sensory Decline

Our five senses—hearing, sight, taste, smell, and touch—connect us to others and the world around us, allowing us to experience things in a number of ways. It’s easy to take our senses for granted, until one or more of them start to diminish.

A decline in one or all of our senses is a natural effect of aging. Health and environmental factors can also facilitate sensory deterioration. Long-time smokers may experience reduced taste and smell sensitivities, while people living with diabetes may have issues with vision.

While sensory changes can be frustrating, acceptance and a positive attitude can help make the changes more manageable. With patience, you can often learn to compensate for the diminished sense with others, while adaptive devices can also provide assistance.

  • Hearing is often considered our most social sense—and can lead to withdrawal and isolation as people become more and more hesitant to interact with others. Misunderstanding others can also lead to paranoia and disagreements. Avoid shouting, speak face-to-face, and eliminate background noise when speaking with someone who has hearing loss.
  • Vision loss can lead to problems with mobility, poor orientation, and even hallucinations. It may keep people from moving around and getting outside, and also lead to isolation. Many low vision aids can help with adapting to this change. Regular eye exams ensure the most up-to-date assistance.
  • A diminished sense of touch affects both the ability to distinguish between different objects and textures, but also to detect pain. Older adults are less likely to perceive internal pain or rising temperatures. They may also miss out on the therapeutic benefits of another person’s touch.
  • Changes in taste and smell often go hand in hand for those over the age of 50, and can cause food to become unappealing. A loss of smell can also create consequences with safety and personal hygiene. Find ways to enhance the flavor of foods without salt, add textures, and follow good oral hygiene to help retain smelling and tasting abilities.

If you notice changes in a loved one, bring it up in a tactful way. Avoid making someone feel inadequate and instead focus on finding ways to help them adapt and remain successful.